Asbestos News Daily
PERITONEAL MESOTHELIOMA

 
     
  Friday, December 15th, 2017 PERITONEAL MESOTHELIOMA
 
 
 
 

ASBESTOSNEWSDAILY.COM NEWS ARCHIVES
AsbestosNewsDaily.com

HOME
MESOTHELIOMA IN THE NEWS
ASBESTOS IN THE NEWS
MESOTHELIOMA WORLD HEADLINES
ASBESTOS IN YOUR NEIGHBORHOOD
ASBESTOS IN THE WORKPLACE
ASBESTOS FACTS AND STATISTICS
SECONDHAND EXPOSURE
MESOTHELIOMA SYMPTOMS
MESOTHELIOMA TREATMENTS
MESOTHELIOMA DIAGNOSIS
MESOTHELIOMA DOCTORS
MESOTHELIOMA SCREENING
MESOTHELIOMA STAGES
MESOTHELIOMA DRUGS
MESOTHELIOMA NUTRITION
MESOTHELIOMA RESEARCH
MESOTHELIOMA CLINICAL TRIALS
MESOTHELIOMA CANCER CENTERS
MESOTHELIOMA BOOK REVIEWS
PLEURAL MESOTHELIOMA
PERICARDIAL MESOTHELIOMA
PERITONEAL MESOTHELIOMA
ASBESTOS RELATED CANCERS
ASBESTOS NAVY VETERANS
ASBESTOS CONTRACTOR FINES
ASBESTOS LEGISLATION
ASBESTOS PRODUCTS LIST
ASBESTOS TRADES LIST
ASBESTOS ALERTS!
MESOTHELIOMA AWARENESS & GRANTS
MESOTHELIOMA COURT VERDICTS
MESOTHELIOMA WRONGFUL DEATH
MESOTHELIOMA LEGAL HISTORY
MESOTHELIOMA LAWYERS
ASBESTOS ODDLY ENOUGH
MESOTHELIOMA LAWSUITS
ALUMINUM PLANTS
CHEMICAL PLANTS
STEEL MILLS
OIL REFINERIES
POWER PLANTS
SHIPYARDS
ASBESTOS COMPANIES
ASBESTOS CITIES
ASBESTOS JOBSITES
ASBESTOS NAVY SHIPS
WOMEN AND MESOTHELIOMA


AsbestosNewsDaily.com

ABOUT US
CONTACT US
PRIVACY POLICY
ASBESTOS BANKRUPTCY CLAIMS
ASBESTOS BANKRUPTCY TRUSTS

MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER BY STATES
AsbestosNewsDaily.com

HOME
ALABAMA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
ALASKA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
ARIZONA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
ARKANSAS MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
CALIFORNIA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
COLORADO MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
CONNECTICUT MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
DELAWARE MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
FLORIDA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
GEORGIA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
HAWAII MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
IDAHO MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
ILLINOIS MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
INDIANA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
IOWA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
KANSAS MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
KENTUCKY MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
LOUISIANA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
MAINE MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
MARYLAND MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
MASSACHUSETTS MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
MICHIGAN MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
MINNESOTA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
MISSISSIPPI MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
MISSOURI MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
MONTANA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
NEBRASKA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
NEVADA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
NEW HAMPSHIRE MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
NEW JERSEY MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
NEW MEXICO MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
NEW YORK MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
NORTH CAROLINA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
NORTH DAKOTA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
OHIO MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
OKLAHOMA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
OREGON MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
PENNSYLVANIA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
RHODE ISLAND MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
SOUTH CAROLINA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
SOUTH DAKOTA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
TENNESSEE MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
TEXAS MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
UTAH MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
VERMONT MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
VIRGINIA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
WASHINGTON MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
WEST VIRGINIA MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
WISCONSIN MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER
WYOMING MESOTHELIOMA LAWYER

Asbestos Mesothelioma Resource Links
AsbestosNewsDaily.com

MESO RESEARCH FOUNDATION
AMERICAN CANCER FOUNDATION
MESOTHELIOMAASBESTOSHELPCENTER.COM
CANCER.GOV - FACTSHEET/TYPES/MESOTHELIOMA
NATIONAL CANCER INSTITUTE - MESOTHELIOMA
CANCER.GOV - RADIATION THERAPY FORCANCER
CANCER.GOV- FACTSHEET/THERAPY/RADIATION
WIKIPEDIA: MESOTHELIOMA PAGE
EPA | INDOORAIR QUALITY | ASBESTOS
NATIONAL INSTITUTE FOR OCCUPATIONAL SAFETY -ASBESTOS
CALIFORNIAGEOLOGICAL SURVEY: ASBESTOS REPORTS -MAPS
ASBESTOS LEGISLATIVEHISTORY
NATIONAL CANCER SURVIVORS DAY FOUNDATION
WORLDCANCERCAMPAIGN.ORG
AMERICA’S ASBESTOS EPIDEMIC
CANCERCARE.ORG
WORLDCANCER DAY - FEBRAURY 04, 2010
NATIONALCANCER INSTITUTE
ASBESTOS DISEASE AWARENESS ORGANIZATION
EPA ASBESTOS HOME PAGE(Environmental Protection Agency)
ASBESTOS CONSTRUCTION HAZARD ALERT(Center to Protect Workers Rights)

 

ASBESTOS DAILY NEWS ADMINISTRATION
AsbestosNewsDaily.com

Report Broken Link
brokenlink@asbestosnewsdaily.com

Submit Asbestos Video
asbestosvideo@asbestosnewsdaily.com

Submit Asbestos Daily News Articles
asbestosnews@asbestosnewsdaily.com

Have a Question?
support@asbestosnewsdaily.com

Need a Lawyer?
needalawyer@asbestosnewsdaily.com

Need a Doctor?
needadoctor@asbestosnewsdaily.com

HONOR OF THE FALLEN SOLDIERS


 UGANDABUYAMBA.COM ORPHAN OUTREACH

 
 
 
 
 
ASBESTOS NEWS DAILY - PERITONEAL MESOTHELIOMA
AsbestosNewsDaily.com
 
18 Related Articles 
 

Peritoneal Mesothelioma


 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
 
 
Peritoneal Mesothelioma – Asbestos Exposure – Asbestos Lung Cancer

Mesothelioma and Lung Cancer Rates Rise Worldwide

Posted on Friday, June 04, 2010

IARC MesotheliomaA new report from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a part of the World Health Organization, states that lung cancer together with related thoracic cancers including malignant pleural mesothelioma are on the rise worldwide.

According to the IARC,1.61 million cases of lung cancer and mesothelioma were diagnosed worldwide in 2008.  Lung and asbestos cancers also accounted for more deaths than any other types of cancer, claiming the lives of 1.38 million people. Taken together, lung cancer and mesothelioma comprised 18.2 percent of all cancer deaths in 2008.

Although mesothelioma is a relatively rare cancer, affecting an estimated 2,000 to 3,000 Americans annually, it is especially aggressive.  Pleural mesothelioma (affecting the lining around the lungs) andperitoneal mesothelioma (affecting the lining of the abdomen) are the most common types.   All types of mesothelioma are caused by asbestos.

Industries in which asbestos use was once common, including the shipping industry and various construction trades, account for the majority of cases of mesothelioma, which can occur years after the person is exposed to asbestos.  Mesothelioma rates on the rise in many poorer nations where lax asbestos regulations and continued asbestos imports (most notably fromCanada) continue to put workers at risk. 

Mesothelioma is not the only type of cancer that has been linked to asbestos exposure.  Inhalation of asbestos has also been implicated in both small cell and non-small cell lung cancers.   In 2009, another IARC study published in the British Medical Journal, The Lancet Oncology, linked asbestos to some throat and ovarian cancers.  According to the National Cancer Institute, asbestos can also increase the risk for kidney, esophageal and gallbladder cancers.

The IARC study estimates that 13.2 million people worldwide will die of cancer annually by the year 2030.  Because asbestos-linked cancers can take 20 to 50 years to develop, mesothelioma and other asbestos related cancers are expected to comprise an increasingly larger percentage of cancer deaths for the next 25 years.

Sources:

Landau, Elizabeth. “WHO predicts 21 million annual cancer cases by 2030”, June 2, 2010, CNN.
Drummond, Katie. “5 Key Warnings in the WHO’s New Cancer Report”, June 1, 2010. Politics Daily.
Straif, Kurt et all. “A review of human carcinogens-Part C: metals, arsenic, dusts, and fibres”, May 15 2009, The Lancet Oncology, Volume 10, Issue 5, pp. 453-454.

  

© Surviving Mesothelioma and Cancer Monthly.  All rights reserved.

 

http://www.survivingmesothelioma.com/news/view.asp?ID=00923


 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
Peritoneal Mesothelioma – Asbestos Exposure – Asbestos Related Deaths

 

Roy Disney succumbs to stomach cancer at age 79

 

The nephew of legendary Walt Disney has died inCalifornia

Syracuse,New York 12/16/2009 09:52 PM GMT (TransWorldNews)

After battling stomach cancer for over a year, the nephew of Walt Disney has passed away. Roy Edward Disney was 79 years old. A spokesman for Walt Disney Co. confirmed Mr. Disney’s death. He died in aCalifornia hospital.

 

Mr. Disney’s father, Roy O. Disney, was the co-founder of the original Disney Entertainment Group, which was founded in 1923. Mr. Disney worked with his father and uncle’s company for almost 60 years, until he stepped down in 2003. Before he stepped down, Mr. Disney held the position of Vice Chairman of the Disney board and Chairman of the Disney Studio’s Animation Department. He continued to hold the position of Title Director Emeritus and Consultant until his passing.

While he served as the head of the animation department, “Disney helped to guide the studio to a new golden age of animation with an unprecedented string of artistic and box office successes.” Mr. Disney worked on “The Little Mermaid,” “Aladdin,” “The Lion King” and “Beauty and the Beast,” among other films.

 

Born in 1930, Mr. Disney entered the showbiz industry when he was 22 as an assistant film editor for the “Dragnet” television series. He attendedPomonaCollege andHarvardUniversity. He was a competitive sailor, holding many records for offshore racing. Mr. Disney won theTranspac sailing race, which spans fromHawaii andCalifornia – almost 3,000 miles - multiple times.

 

In 1931, Mr. Disney joined his father and uncle and began work with the Disney Entertainment company. He was nominated twice for an Oscar, the first time in 1959 for his work on the short film entitled “Mysteries of the Deep,” and the second for his 2003 production of “Destino,” based on the art of legendary artist Salvador Dali. In 1978, he formed an investment company called Shamrock Holdings.

 

There are many forms of stomach cancer, including a rare type known asperitonealmesothelioma.Peritonealmesothelioma is caused by asbestos exposure, and manifests in the peritoneum, or lining of the stomach. Unfortunately, unlike other forms of cancer,peritonealmesothelioma is extremely difficult to treat, and while some patients may respond to palliative treatments, such as chemoor radiation, the majoritywill succumb to the disease in less than two years following their diagnosis. There is nomesothelioma cure.

 

Mesothelioma – includingperitonealmesothelioma and the two other forms ofmesothelioma, pleural and pericardial – has a latency period of as many as fifty years. Symptoms ofperitonealmesothelioma include stomach and chest pain. Often,peritonealmesotheliomais misdiagnosed as a hernia.

A private funeral will be held for Mr. Disney, and his ashes will be scattered at sea.

 

For additional information about peritonealmesothelioma cancer, includingmesothelioma symptoms, diagnostic procedures, andmesothelioma treatment options, please visit Mesothelioma.com.

 

http://www.transworldnews.com/NewsStory.aspx?id=149167&cat=10

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
Peritoneal Mesothelioma –Mesothelioma Symptoms – Mesothelioma Cancer

Mesothelioma: A Cancer That Can Hide In Your Body For Up To 50 Years

Saturday, 13 March 2010 00:40TobiRaikkonen

Mesothelioma CancerMesothelioma Cancer

Mesothelioma is a type of cancer caused by exposure to the carcinogen asbestos. Asbestos was widely used a few decades ago in construction when its ill effects weren't known yet.

Mesothelioma symptoms

Most patients diagnosed withmesothelioma are well into old age due to the fact that once contact with asbestos has occurred, the symptoms start to show anywhere between 15 to 50 years later. Because of this, it is almost impossible to catch the disease in its early stages. To properly identify the disease, x-rays of the chest and pulmonary function tests are required.

3 types ofmesothelioma cancers

There are three known forms ofmesothelioma: Pleural,Peritoneal,and Pericardialmesothelioma. The most common is Pleuralmesothelioma which occurs in more than half the cases, second isPeritoneal and lastlyPericardial which is very rare (only about 5 percent ofmeshothelioma cases). Each has its own unique set of symptoms:

  • Pleuralmesothelioma: Coughing of blood, chest palpitations, tiredness and difficulty breathing.
  • Peritonealmesothelioma: Tiredness, rapid weight loss, vomiting, diarrhea, tummy aches and anemia.
  • Pericardialmesothelioma: Chest and heart palpitations, shortness of breath and tiredness.

Mesothelioma in the media

Mesothelioma cases are usually heavily publicized andmesothelioma lawyers take them very seriously due to the huge payouts from settlements by defending companies.

Additionally,mesothelioma can affect anyone. Since the disease is transferred by contact with harmful asbestos chemicals, no one is safe, no matter how fit or strong their immune system may be. Such is the case of all-star athleteMerlin Olsen, a Hall of Fame defensive tackle with the Los Angeles Rams who died yesterday frommesothelioma caused by exposure to asbestos. No one knows how long Merlin Olsen was fighting the disease, as thelife expectancy ofmesothelioma patients vary greatly from individual to individual.

http://www.ozcarguide.com/health/health-a-z/cancer/2339-mesothelioma-cancer

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
Peritoneal Mesothelioma – Asbestos Exposure – Mesothelioma and Women

 

Mesothelioma Symptoms Target Women's Health

Written by Amy Wister   

Friday, 07 May 2010 04:51

Mesothelioma is a very rare form of cancer that develops in the membranes or protective sacs surrounding various organs of the body. These membranes are referred to as themesothelium and theyprotects organs by producing a type of liquid which allows for mobility of the organs. Specifically, in the case of the lungs, themesothelium fluid allows ease of movement when breathing. Mesothelioma cancer can begin anywhere in themesothelium and can be either benign or cancerous.Exposure to asbestos fibers is a known cause ofmesothelioma.

Asbestos is resistant to heat and has been used as the main material in roofing, waterproofing compounds, flooring and insulation. Its versatile nature made it a useful component in various products on the market, but it is extremely dangerous if inhaled, even in very small amounts. Inhaled asbestos fibers pass through the respiratory tract and come into contact with linings of the lungs which can result in pleuralmesothelioma. Ingestion of asbestos fibers can affect other linings in the abdominal cavity which results inperitonealmesothelioma. The real tragedy of asbestosmesothelioma is that it usually takes many years for symptoms to develop.

The signs ofmesothelioma are typically weight loss with no change in diet, extreme tiredness, difficulty swallowing, hoarse or husky voice, difficulty breathing,a cough that lasts for an extended period of time, chest pain or back pain, extreme sweating and recurring fever.Peritonealmesothelioma commonly affects the bowel, liver and spleen an often shows signs similar to other bowel related diseases. The first symptoms are typically pain in the abdomen, constipation or diarrhea, an increase in the size of the belly area, nausea, vomiting, fever and anemia.

It is important for an individual to seek medical care if they have had any of these symptoms or have been exposed to asbestos earlier in their life. Mesothelioma takes time to develop so the exposure may have occurred as long ago as 50 years earlier. A trained cancer specialist is the best person to diagnosismesothelioma.

Mesothelioma symptoms may occur many months before the disease is detected by a medical professional. Pleuralmesothelioma is the most common form ofmesothelioma and represents two thirds of all themesothelioma cases reported. The pleura lining of the lungs and chest are the areas affected by pleuralmesothelioma.

Asbestos is still found almost everywhere, at home, at work, or in public buildings. Workers involved in building demolition should take extra care and precautions to avoid contact with asbestos through inhalation or ingestion. The low rate ofmesothelioma cases detected over the past 20 years is increasing as more individuals develop symptoms and seek medical attention.

In theUnited States almost 2,000 new cases ofmesothelioma are detected each year. Mesothelioma cancer has historically occurred mostly in men because they were typically the ones involved in activities that required the use of asbestos. Industrial workers, miners, railroad workers, and those involved in the construction and insulation industries were most susceptible. Most recently, the incidence ofmesothelioma in women has increased as we begin to learn more about how asbestos fibers remained in clothing, automobiles, furniture, and affected an industrial worker’s entire household.

 

Author of this article:Amy Wister

 

http://www.release-news.com/index.php/health-a-fitness/6543-mesothelioma-symptoms-target-womens-health.html
 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
Peritoneal Mesothelioma – Asbestos Exposure – Asbestos Lung Cancer

 

Mesothelioma and Lung Cancer Rates Rise Worldwide

Posted on Friday, June 04, 2010

IARC MesotheliomaA new report from the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), a part of the World Health Organization, states that lung cancer together with related thoracic cancers including malignant pleuralmesothelioma are on the rise worldwide.

According to the IARC,1.61 million cases of lung cancer andmesothelioma were diagnosed worldwide in 2008.  Lung and asbestos cancers also accounted for more deaths than any other types of cancer, claiming the lives of 1.38 million people. Taken together, lung cancer andmesothelioma comprised 18.2 percent of all cancer deaths in 2008.

Althoughmesothelioma is a relatively rare cancer, affecting an estimated 2,000 to 3,000 Americans annually, it is especially aggressive.  Pleuralmesothelioma (affecting the lining around the lungs) andperitonealmesothelioma (affecting the lining of the abdomen) are the most common types.   All types ofmesothelioma are caused by asbestos.

Industries in which asbestos use was once common, including the shipping industry and various construction trades, account for the majority of cases ofmesothelioma, which can occur years after the person is exposed to asbestos.  Mesothelioma rates on the rise in many poorer nations where lax asbestos regulations and continued asbestos imports (most notably fromCanada) continue to put workers at risk. 

Mesothelioma is not the only type of cancer that has been linked to asbestos exposure.  Inhalation of asbestos has also been implicated in both small cell and non-small cell lung cancers.   In 2009, another IARC study published in the British Medical Journal, The Lancet Oncology, linked asbestos to some throat and ovarian cancers.  According to the National Cancer Institute, asbestos can also increase the risk for kidney, esophageal and gallbladder cancers.

The IARC study estimates that 13.2 million people worldwide will die of cancer annually by the year 2030.  Because asbestos-linked cancers can take 20 to 50 years to develop,mesothelioma and other asbestos related cancers are expected to comprise an increasingly larger percentage of cancer deaths for the next 25 years.

Sources:

Landau, Elizabeth. “WHO predicts 21 million annual cancer cases by 2030”, June 2, 2010, CNN.
Drummond, Katie. “5 Key Warnings in theWHO’s New Cancer Report”, June 1, 2010.Politics Daily.
Straif, Kurtet all. “A review of human carcinogens-Part C: metals, arsenic, dusts, andfibres”, May 15 2009, The Lancet Oncology, Volume 10, Issue 5, pp. 453-454.

  

© Surviving Mesothelioma and Cancer Monthly.  All rights reserved.

 

http://www.survivingmesothelioma.com/news/view.asp?ID=00923

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
Peritoneal Mesothelioma – Asbestos Trades – $14 Million Mesothelioma Award

Mesothelioma Lawsuit - $14M Awarded To Construction Worker

Byjayita, Gaea News Network

May 28th, 2010

Lungs

FLORIDA (GaeaTimes.com) — AMesothelioma lawsuit filed by WilliamAubin against Union Carbide earned him $14 million.Aubin, aSarasota construction worker was awarded by aFlorida jury.

Aubin had filed complaint against the chemical manufacturer and several other defendants such as Georgia-Pacific for their failure to warn construction companies against their compound, made of asbestos.

Aubin started fighting against these companies after he was allegedly diagnosed withPeritoneal Mesothelioma in the 1970s. Before that he used to work for his parents’ construction company, Key Biscayne.

Mesothelioma is a rare form of cancer. The disease is caused by exposure to asbestos and inhaling asbestos fibers. The rare form of cancer is found in the chest and lung. But unlike lung cancer development ofmesothelioma is not related to smoking.

Peritonealmesothelioma is a fatal and rare form of the disease that affects theabdominal cavity. Only 30% of Mesothelioma cancer cases are diagnosed asPeritonealmesothelioma.

Asbestos which is the root cause of the disease is mainly used in several manufacturing and construction companies. Although the most use of asbestos were banned in mid 1980s, the number ofmesothelioma deaths toll is rising each year, according to the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention reports.

Asbestosmesothelioma lawsuits are the longest running mass movements by the people ofU.S. Over 600,000 people have filed lawsuits against 6,000 defendants after being diagnosed withmesothelioma, asbestosis or other asbestos-related diseases.

The award forAubin was announced last week, when aMiami jury had determined thatUnion Carbide was chiefly responsible forAubin’s cancer. However, they didn’t refute the possibility of other defendants having shared the similar responsibility.

http://blog.taragana.com/health/2010/05/28/mesothelioma-lawsuit-14m-awarded-to-construction-worker-23573/

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
Peritoneal Mesothelioma – Asbestos Exposure – Mesothelioma Cancer

 

Mesothelioma Symptoms Target Women's Health

Written by Amy Wister   

Friday, 07 May 2010 04:51

Mesotheliomais a very rare form of cancer that develops in the membranes or protective sacs surrounding various organs of the body. These membranes are referred to as themesothelium and theyprotects organs by producing a type of liquid which allows for mobility of the organs. Specifically, in the case of the lungs, themesothelium fluid allows ease of movement when breathing. Mesothelioma cancer can begin anywhere in themesothelium and can be either benign or cancerous. Exposure to asbestos fibers is a known cause ofmesothelioma.

Asbestos is resistant to heat and has been used as the main material in roofing, waterproofing compounds, flooring and insulation. Its versatile nature made it a useful component in various products on the market, but it is extremely dangerous if inhaled, even in very small amounts. Inhaled asbestos fibers pass through the respiratory tract and come into contact with linings of the lungs which can result in pleuralmesothelioma. Ingestion of asbestos fibers can affect other linings in the abdominal cavity which results inperitonealmesothelioma. The real tragedy of asbestosmesothelioma is that it usually takes many years for symptoms to develop.

The signs ofmesothelioma are typically weight loss with no change in diet, extreme tiredness, difficulty swallowing, hoarse or husky voice, difficulty breathing,a cough that lasts for an extended period of time, chest pain or back pain, extreme sweating and recurring fever.Peritonealmesothelioma commonly affects the bowel, liver and spleen an often shows signs similar to other bowel related diseases. The first symptoms are typically pain in the abdomen, constipation or diarrhea, an increase in the size of the belly area, nausea, vomiting, fever and anemia.

It is important for an individual to seek medical care if they have had any of these symptoms or have been exposed to asbestos earlier in their life. Mesothelioma takes time to develop so the exposure may have occurred as long ago as 50 years earlier. A trained cancer specialist is the best person to diagnosismesothelioma.

Mesothelioma symptoms may occur many months before the disease is detected by a medical professional. Pleuralmesothelioma is the most common form ofmesothelioma and represents two thirds of all themesothelioma cases reported. The pleura lining of the lungs and chest are the areas affected by pleuralmesothelioma.


Asbestos is still found almost everywhere, at home, at work, or in public buildings. Workers involved in building demolition should take extra care and precautions to avoid contact with asbestos through inhalation or ingestion. The low rate ofmesothelioma cases detected over the past 20 years is increasing as more individuals develop symptoms and seek medical attention.

In theUnited States almost 2,000 new cases ofmesothelioma are detected each year. Mesothelioma cancer has historically occurred mostly in men because they were typically the ones involved in activities that required the use of asbestos. Industrial workers, miners, railroad workers, and those involved in the construction and insulation industries were most susceptible. Most recently, the incidence ofmesothelioma in women has increased as we begin to learn more about how asbestos fibers remained in clothing, automobiles, furniture, and affected an industrial worker’s entire household.

 

Author of this article:Amy Wister

 

http://www.release-news.com/index.php/health-a-fitness/6543-mesothelioma-symptoms-target-womens-health.html
 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
Peritoneal Mesothelioma – Asbestos Exposure – Mesothelioma Research

Peritoneal mesothelioma’s prognostic factors determined by Australian research

By asbestoshub | May 25, 2010

Quoted fromhttp://www.ibtimes.com/contents/20100514/mesothelioma.htm

14 May, 2010 @ 11:01 pm EDT

Recent Australian study has assessed prognostic aspects for patients withperitoneal mesothelioma who have underwent cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC).

The HIPEC procedure consists of a combination of surgery and the use of a heated chemotherapy liquid that is spread throughout the patient’s abdominal cavity while they are in the surgical room.

The chemotherapy drug’s general effectiveness has been found to increase through the use of the high temperature liquid.

The survival rate for patients withmesothelioma is usually very low, and though life expectancy for most falls in between four to 18 months following diagnosis and available treatments, they do not cure the condition.

The research involved 20 patients withmesothelioma at St George Hospital, where scientists used Kaplan-Meier technique to measure their survival duration following treatments.

The results showed average survival duration for the average age of patients - which was 55 years old - was 30 months. The survival duration of one and three-year period were 78 per cent and 46 per cent.

The average time of disease-free survival for all patients involved was 8 months.

Longer disease-free survival was influenced by these criteria - aged 55 or more, female, and those with an epithelial subtype.

Other prognostic indicators that influenced the overall survival included, complete cytoreduction, not drinking alcohol and the presence of epitheliod tumours.

The research determined risk factors proven prognostic for survival were not smoking, not drinking alcohol, female gender and having an epitheliod subtype.

http://asbestoshub.com/2010/05/25/peritoneal-mesotheliomas-prognostic-factors-determined-by-australian-research/

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
Peritoneal Mesothelioma – Asbestos Exposure – 414 Million Mesothelioma Award

Florida man awarded $14 million in asbestos case

BY LAURA MORALES Posted on Thursday, 05.20.10

llmorales@MiamiHerald.com

A Miami-Dade jury has awarded aSarasota man more than $14 million after deciding that the asbestos he inhaled in the 1970s caused his deadlyabdominal cancer.

Jurors found that chemical giant Union Carbide was negligent for selling asbestos fibers to other companies, which had used the fibers to make joint compounds used by construction companies -- such as the one William Aubin's family owned.

According to Aubin, his parents, who founded Aubin Construction on Key Biscayne in the 1960s, used the asbestos-laden compounds. Aubin, now 59 and a retired firefighter, worked in his parents' company after they moved it toSarasota.

That's how his client was exposed to asbestos and eventually developedperitoneal mesothelioma, said Juan Bauta, who argued the case for the Ferraro Law Firm.

``The products weren't labeled as containing asbestos,'' Bauta said.

Jurors also found that four of the compound manufacturers, including Georgia-Pacific, share some of the responsibility for causing Aubin's illness.

Peritoneal mesothelioma is a rare -- and usually fatal -- cancer that attacks the lining of the abdominal cavity and organs. Aubin's lawyers argued that he is ``permanently impaired and will ultimately and unfortunately die from mesothelioma.''

In April 2008, Miami-Dade jurors awarded more than $24 million to a Weston doctor who contracted the same illness. It was the largest compensatory jury verdict involving a single defendant in aFlorida asbestos case.

Bauta said he expects Union Carbide to appeal the verdict.

Michael Terry, a Texas-based attorney who represented the company, could not be reached for comment.

Read more: http://www.miamiherald.com/2010/05/20/1639044/florida-man-awarded-14-million.html#ixzz0q1EUkXEs

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
Peritoneal Mesothelioma – Asbestos Trades –$7 Million Mesothelioma Verdict

 

$7 millionNew Jersey verdict

 

June 23rd, 2008 by Wendi Lewis

 

ANew Jersey jury awarded aLinden woman $7.5 million verdict againstExxonMobile Corp., saying she contractedperitonealmesothelioma as a result of handling her husband’s clothing. John Anderson was employed at a refinery that was owned byExxonMobile at the time, and his wife Bonnie hadsecondary exposure to his“take homeasbestos fibers for years, according to a report in NJBIZ magazine.

 

ExxonMobile was found responsible for themesothelioma cancer last year. The trial to determine damages began approximately two weeks ago, resulting in the $7.5 million verdict in favor of Mrs. Anderson. According to the report,ExxonMobile plans to appeal the verdict.

 

http://www.mesothelioma.law.pro/news/2008/06/23/7-million-new-jersey-verdict/

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
Peritoneal Mesothelioma – Mesothelioma Research

Malignant Mesothelioma and Simian Virus 40 (SV40)

Category: Posted on: April 26, 2010 5:00 PM, by Tara C. Smith

Student guest post by Andrew Behan

Malignant Mesothelioma (MM) is a rare type of cancer which manifests itself in the thin cells lining the human body's internal organs. There are three types of MM; pleural mesothelioma,peritoneal mesothelioma, and pericardial mesothelioma, affecting the lining of the lungs, abdominal cavity, and lining of the heart, respectively (1). Pleural mesothelioma is most common, consisting of about70% of all MM cases and has a poor prognosis; patients live a median time of 18 months after diagnosis. (Note: for the purposes of this article, MM will be used to represent pleural mesothelioma exclusively.) Despite its discovery in the mid-1800's, MM was not linked to asbestos until the late 1900's, when case reports of fast-growing lung cancers, different from previously described lung cancers, motivated investigators to uncover undisputed evidence linking asbestos to MM. Measures to reduce/eliminate asbestos from buildings reduced exposure to the cancer-causing agents found within the material, and public health officials remained confident by the year 2000 MM cases would decline in the U.S. and parts of Europe. Despite these predictions, MM cases have not declined. In fact, the incidence of MM is on the rise (1). Consequently, investigators have focused their attention on other factors to explain the steady incidence of MM in theU.S., eventually naming Simian Virus 40 (SV40) as a potential cause of MM.

You might be asking, "SV40? What's that?" SV40 is a virus originally discovered in 1960 in kidney cells of rhesus monkeys. SV40 is dormant and asymptomatic in rhesus monkeys, but was later found to cause kidney disease, sarcoma, and other cancers in animal models. Later on, it was found SV40 attacks p53 gene (a tumor suppressor) and can interrupt the cell's ability to perform apoptosis, or cell death. This makes the cells immortal, leading to tumor formation, or cancer (2). Controversy arose when the discovery of SV40 was found in the rhesus monkey kidney cells because these same cells were being utilized to form the polio vaccine. Consequently, many polio vaccines were contaminated with SV40 and when the vaccine was used to inoculate humans, SV40 was passed to humans along with the inactive form of the polio virus. It was estimated over 98 million Americans received the vaccine from 1955-1963, when a proportion of the vaccine was contaminated with SV40. Of the 98 million vaccinated during this time period, it was estimated 10-30 million of those individuals were exposed to SV40. Naturally, people who received contaminated forms of the vaccine were afraid they would develop cancer from exposure to SV40.

Since the controversy began in 1960, research has been devoted to confirming its role in cancer development in humans, as well as many animal models. As I mentioned above, presence of SV40 in animals has led to tumors and other cancers, and a few studies have found presence of SV40 in humans who have developed MM. For example, Carbone et al. found SV40 in mesothelial cells of humans who had developed MM, but not in the surrounding tissue (3). They did not find SV40 in patients who had other lung cancers, possibly reinforcing the specificity of their findings (3). Overall, 54% of MM cases were found to have SV40 infection within the mesothelial cells (3). The investigators determined more research needed to be done to see if SV40 infection alone could cause MM, or if other factors, such as immunosuppression or exposure to asbestos, were necessary for development of MM.

Other studies were not as convincing. For example, Lopez-Rios et al. reported that initially they detected SV40 in about 60% of MM specimens, and then they determined that most of the positive results were caused by plasmid PCR contamination, and that only 6% of the initially positive samples were confirmed to contain SV40 DNA (4). However, studies have shown the presence of SV40 in human specimens by using several other techniques besides PCR, including Southern blotting, immunostaining, RNA in situ hybridization, microdissection, and electron microscopy" (5).

Thus, the question remains: does SV40 cause MM, or does SV40 infection, in conjunction with asbestos exposure, generate a greater risk for the development of MM? This is a tough question to answer, because although asbestos is no longer mined in theU.S., it is still being imported; workers are still continually being exposed to asbestos. However, the use of asbestos has nearly ceased, decreasing from 813,000 metric tons in 1973, to 1700 metric tons in 2007 (6). The other problem in teasing out SV40 as a cause of MM from asbestos lies in the latency period between asbestos exposure and MM clinical diagnosis. According to the CDC, the latency period for someone who is first exposed to asbestos and clinical disease is 20-40 years. It may be, given asbestos still remains in many buildings, and exposure to it is inevitable when removal is completed, in addition to the long latency period between exposure and disease, that we have not yet come to the dramatic decrease in MM health officials have predicted. Or, is SV40 infection the culprit and the increase in incidence of MM will continue to rise? According to the SV40 Foundation, "SV40 is a problem that federal government authorities have not addressed responsibly because the government's own vaccine programs are responsible for the spread of the virus throughout the western world".(2) It is no question the public has not forgotten, even after almost 50 years, and much more research into this area is needed, to attempt to confirm SV40's causal role, if any, in the development of MM.

References

(1) Mesothelioma. Retrieved April 2010.

(2) "Treating SV40 Cancers." Retrieved April 2010.

(3) Carbone, M. "Simian virus 40 and human tumors: It is time to study mechanisms." Retrieved from PubMed April 2010.

(4) López-Ríos F, Illei PB, Rusch V, et al. "Evidence against a role for SV40 infection in human mesotheliomas and high risk of false-positive PCR results owing to presence of SV40 sequences in common laboratory plasmids". Lancet. 2004;364:1157-1166.

(5) Yang, Haining et al. "Mesothelioma Epidemiology, Carcinogenesis, and Pathogenesis." http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov.proxy.lib.uiowa.edu/pmc/articles/PMC2717086/. Retrieved from PubMed April 2010

(6) CDC. "Mesothelioma" Retrieved from PubMed April 2010.

http://scienceblogs.com/aetiology/2010/04/malignant_mesothelioma_and_sim.php

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 

Malignant Mesothelioma– Wrongful Death

Philadelphia Asbestos Verdict - $25.2 million

The Legal Intelligencer – March 20, 2008

The Legal Intelligencer reports that after a reverse-bifurcated trial, aPhiladelphia jury awarded $25.2 million in compensatory and punitive damages to compensate formalignant mesothelioma deaths. Plaintiffs in the three cases requestedKentucky law; two settled after the compensatory damage phase. According to plaintiffs’ attorneys,Kentucky law ultimately permitted the jury to award higher punitive damages than it could underPennsylvania law. Here’s an excerpt:

His case,Baccus v. Crane Co., was brought against the Crane Co., John Crane and Yarway, a company. The defendants sought to haveKentucky law apply to the jury's findings inBaccus and the judge agreed. The jury had previously awarded $7 million in compensatory damages to Baccus and apportioned liability in the amount of 45 percent against John Crane, 35 percent against Crane Co. and 20 percent against Yarway, Shein said.

The jury, applyingKentucky law, also found Yarway and Crane Co. "grossly negligent for failure to warn of the dangers of asbestos in reckless disregard of the safety of others," Shein said. The jurors assessed $11.9 million in punitive damages against Crane Co. and $6.3 million against Yarway.

Shein said this is the first case inPhiladelphia he has seen in more than 20 years in which a jury awarded punitive damages in an asbestos case. He said the standard for applying such damages in an asbestos case inPennsylvania is "much, much higher." He saidPennsylvania usually defers the finding of punitive damages until later in the case whereasKentucky law instructs the court to do it sooner.

The defendants, Shein said, wanted to apply Kentucky law because it uses an apportioned liability standard in which each of the defendants, even those who previously settled, are given an individual portion of liability. ThePennsylvania model is more akin to "in for a penny, in for a pound," Shein said, in which each defendant splits the damages equally.

"The thing kind of backfired on them because the jury held all of the settled defendants zero-percent responsible," he said.

The defendants that settled before the compensatory damages phase of the trial were Ingersoll Rand, THAN, IMO/DeLaval, Westinghouse, OwensIllinois and Goulds Pumps.

http://lawprofessors.typepad.com/mass_tort_litigation/2008/03/philadelphia-as.html

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 

Peritoneal Mesothelioma

The second most common type of malignant mesothelioma, peritoneal mesothelioma attacks the abdominal cavity (stomach). The incidence of malignant peritoneal mesothelioma (MPM) is approximately 2 to 2.6 cases per million annually. Most people who develop mesothelioma have worked on jobs where they inhaled asbestos particles.

Symptoms of Malignant Peritoneal Mesothelioma

Symptoms of peritoneal mesothelioma include weight loss, and abdominal pain and swelling due to a buildup of fluid (effusion) in the abdomen. Other symptoms may include bowel obstruction, blood clotting abnormalities, anemia, and fever. If the cancer has spread beyond the mesothelium to other parts of the body, symptoms may include pain, trouble swallowing, or swelling of the neck or face.

These symptoms may be caused by mesothelioma or by other, less serious conditions. It is important to see a doctor about any of these symptoms. Only a doctor can make a diagnosis.

Peritoneal Mesothelioma Diagnosis

Diagnosing pleural mesothelioma is often difficult because the symptoms are similar to those of a number of other conditions. Diagnosis begins with a review of the patient's medical history, including any history of asbestos exposure. A complete physical examination may be performed, including x-rays of the chest or abdomen.A CT (or CAT) scan or an MRI may also be useful.A CT scan is a series of detailed pictures of areas inside the body created by a computer linked to an x-ray machine. In an MRI, a powerful magnet linked to a computer is used to make detailed pictures of areas inside the body. These pictures are viewed on a monitor and can also be printed.

A biopsy is needed to confirm a diagnosis of mesothelioma. In a biopsy, a surgeon or a medical oncologist (a doctor who specializes in diagnosing and treating cancer) removes a sample of tissue for examination under a microscope by a pathologist. To do this the doctor may perform a peritoneoscopy. To obtain tissue for examination, the doctor makes a small opening in the abdomen and inserts a special instrument called a peritoneoscope into the abdominal cavity. If these procedures do not yield enough tissue, more extensive diagnostic surgery may be necessary.

Peritoneal Mesothelioma Staging

If the diagnosis is pleural mesothelioma, the doctor will want to learn the stage (or extent) of the disease. Staging involves more tests in a careful attempt to find out whether the cancer has spread and, if so, to which parts of the body. Knowing the stage of the disease helps the doctor plan treatment. MPM is described as localized if the cancer is found only on the membrane surface where it originated. It is classified as advanced if it has spread beyond the original membrane surface to other parts of the body, such as the lymph nodes, or abdominal organs.

Peritoneal Mesothelioma Treatment

Treatment for pleural mesothelioma depends on the location of the cancer, the stage of the disease, and the patient's age and general health. Standard treatment options include surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. Sometimes, these treatments are combined.

Surgery is a common treatment for mesothelioma. The doctor may remove part of the lining of the abdomen and some of the tissue around it.

Radiation therapy, also called radiotherapy, involves the use of high-energy rays to kill cancer cells and shrink tumors. Radiation therapy affects the cancer cells only in the treated area. The radiation may come from a machine (external radiation) or from putting materials that produce radiation through thin plastic tubes into the area where the cancer cells are found (internal radiation therapy).

Chemotherapy is the use of anticancer drugs to kill cancer cells throughout the body. Most drugs used to treat mesothelioma are given by injection into a vein (intravenous, or IV). Doctors are also studying the effectiveness of putting chemotherapy directly into the abdomen (intracavitary chemotherapy).

To relieve symptoms and control pain, the doctor may use a needle or a thin tube to drain fluid (effusions) that has built up in the abdomen. Removal of fluid from the abdomen is called paracentesis. Radiation therapy and surgery may also be helpful in relieving symptoms.

New treatments for malignant peritoneal mesothelioma

Because malignant peritoneal mesothelioma is hard to control, the National Cancer Institute is sponsoring 14 clinical trials (research studies with people) that are designed to find new treatments and better ways to use current treatments. Before any new treatment can be recommended for general use, doctors conduct clinical trials to find out whether the treatment is safe for patients and effective against the disease. Clinical trials are an important treatment option for many patients with peritoneal mesothelioma.

One example of a new approach is a drug called Veglin being studied by Dr. Gill at the USC/Norris Comprehensive Cancer Center. Veglin is one of several newly developed non-chemotherapy drugs being tested in the ongoing struggle to combat malignant mesothelioma. It is an anti-angiogenesis agent that works by cutting off the blood supply the cancer needs in order to grow. A phase I trial has already been completed and a phase II trial is underway. More information on Veglin and the trial can be found at http://www.mesorfa.org/treatments/veglin.php . Patients interested in taking part in a clinical trial should talk with their doctor.

http://mesotheliomaasbestoshelpcenter.com/mesothelioma-cancer/peritoneal-mesothelioma.html
 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 

Peritoneal Mesothelioma: A Review: Pathology

Authors and Disclosures

Pathology

Mesotheliomas have 3 basic histologic forms: epithelioid (the most frequent), sarcomatoid or mixed (biphasic). More often, areas showing features and admixtures of these three types may be encountered within a single tumor; a sarcomatoid component is observed in 25% of cases,[31,32] but a pure sarcomatoid variety is extremely rare and only 32 cases have been reported in the literature since 2006 (Table 1 ).

The epithelioid MPM can grow with 4 different patterns: tubular, papillary (the most common, often found in association with other patterns), diffuse, and deciduoid (cells with abundant glassy eosinophilic cytoplasm). Atypia is a frequent feature but is typically mild; only a few cases have moderate or severe atypia.[16] Unusual histologic features include lymphoid follicles, striking myxoid stroma, prominent foamy histiocytes, and marked vascular proliferation. Multicystic mesotheliomas and well-differentiated papillary mesothelioma are histological types associated with a long survival in the absence of treatment.[8]

Sarcomatoid mesothelioma is extremely rare: Neumann and colleagues[33] in a series of 53, and Deraco and colleagues[34] in a series of 49 MPM reported no sarcomatoid histotypes. It is composed of a fascicular proliferation of spindle cells with oval nuclei, scant amphophilic cytoplasm and occasionally prominent nucleoli. In general, sarcomatoid mesotheliomas show more atypia than their epithelioid counterparts, and often display mitotic activity and foci of necrosis. The tumor cells can display a fibrosarcoma-like appearance; therefore, sarcomatoid MPM must be differentiated from the rare variant of extra-intestinal gastrointestinal stromal tumors (GISTs) with sarcomatoid features or from true retroperitoneal sarcomas.

A large number of immunohistochemical markers have been suggested for diagnostic aid, but none of the markers alone is diagnostic. However, they become very useful when used as a panel. Malignant MPM is characterized by positive staining for EMA, calretinin, WT1, cytokeratin 5/6, antimesothelial cell antibody-1, and mesothelin. Cytokeratins help to confirm invasion and to distinguish mesothelioma from sarcoma and melanoma. Mesotheliomas are characterized by the absence of antigens such as carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA), thyroid transcription factor-1, B72.3, MOC-31, Ber-EP4, and BG8.[29] Immunohistochemistry is also useful to distinguish peritoneal mesotheliomas from primary papillary serous carcinoma of peritoneum, serous ovarian carcinomas, colorectal adenocarcinoma diffusely involving the peritoneum, and borderline serous tumors. In particular, calretinin, cytokeratin, and thrombomodulin are typically positive in patients with mesotheliomas and negative in those with serous carcinomas.

Detecting characteristic ultrastructural features by electron microscopy may help the diagnosis of malignant mesothelioma.[31] Typical mesothelioma show tall and thin microvilli on the cell surface. It has been suggested that only microvilli whose length exceeds the width by a margin of 15:1 are diagnostic of mesothelioma.[35] Because the microvilli are often poorly developed in the sarcomatoid variety, electron microscopy is generally not useful in their diagnosis.[36]

Peritoneal mesothelioma usually remains confined to the peritoneal cavity for most of its natural history. Typical growth pattern of peritoneal mesothelioma is locally expansive masses. Hematogenous or lymphatic metastasis is unusual. However, parasternal,[37] retroperitoneal,[38] mediastinal,[39,40] axillary, supraclavicular,[41] and cervical[40] lymph nodes; lung,[42] bone,[41,43] liver,[40] and umbilical ('Sister Mary Joseph's nodule')[44] metastases have all been reported.

http://www.medscape.com/viewarticle/555473_5

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 

Peritoneal Cyst

peritoneal cyst

This 8-centimeter cyst was incidentally found at hysterectomy floating free in the peritoneal cavity, a Zeppelin of the abdomen, if you will. Before making the diagnosis of this benign lesion, it is important for the pathologist to quiz the surgeon concerning the intra-abdominal findings. A cyst excised from a multicystic mesothelioma may look similar to this, and while multicystic mesothelioma may not be a true neoplasm, it has a stubborn tendency to recur locally.

The original photo was taken with a Nikon FE2, Nikkor macro lens, and Ektachrome Elite 100 film. The subject was lit by 4 photofloods. The film is balanced for daylight, so a blue compensation filter was used. The transparency was scanned with a Polaroid SprintScan 35 and edited with Photoshop 3.04. Digital editing included using the Dust and Scratches filter to remove lint from the background, and employing the Levels command to balance the dynamic range.

Photograph by Ed Uthman, MD. Public domain. Posted 30 May 99

http://web2.airmail.net/uthman/specimens/images/perit_cyst.html

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 

Peritoneal carcinomatosis: patients selection, perioperative complications and quality of life related to cytoreductive surgery and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy

Peritoneal tumor dissemination arising from colorectal cancer, appendiceal cancer, gastric cancer, gynecologic malignancies or peritoneal mesothelioma is a common sign of advanced tumor stage or disease recurrence and mostly associated with poor prognosis. Methods and resultsIn the present review article preoperative workup, surgical technique, postoperative morbidity and mortality rates, oncological outcome and quality of life after CRS and HIPEC are reported regarding the different tumor entities.

Conclusions: Cytoreductive surgery (CRS) and hyperthermic intraperitoneal chemotherapy (HIPEC) provide a promising combined treatment strategy for selected patients with peritoneal carcinomatosis that can improve patient survival and quality of life.

The extent of intraperitoneal tumor dissemination and the completeness of cytoreduction are the leading predictors of postoperative patient outcome. Thus, consistent preoperative diagnostics and patient selection are crucial to obtain a complete macroscopic cytoreduction (CCR-0/1).


Author: Gabriel Glockzin, Hans J Schlitt and Pompiliu Piso
Credits/Source: World Journal of Surgical Oncology 2009, 7:5

http://7thspace.com/headlines/301489/peritoneal_carcinomatosis_patients_selection_perioperative_complications_and_quality_of_life_related_to_cytoreductive_surgery_and_hyperthermic_intraperitoneal_chemotherapy.html

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
Late cutaneous metastases to the face from malignant pleural mesothelioma: A case report and review of the literature
Malignant Mesothelioma is a rare primary neoplasm affecting the serosal membranes. During its relative short course, this malignant neoplasm can give local and, rarely, distant haematogenous metastases in different organs.

The reported metastatic sites include liver, lung, heart, brain, thyroid, adrenals, kidneys, pancreas, bone, soft tissue, skin and lymph nodes.Case Presentation:We report a sixty one year-old man with a history of malignant pleural epithelioid mesothelioma treated with six cycles of Pemetrexed and Carboplatin completed 03/11/04 followed by radiotherapy to the drain site 250Kv/TD20Gy/5F completed 13/12/2004. Then he developed multiple facial skin lesions 4 years later.

These lesions were proved to be metastatic malignant sarcomatoid mesothelioma.

Conclusion: Mesothelioma metastases should be suspected in any known Mesothelioma patient with newly developed skin lesion.

Author: Alaaeldeen ElbahaieDia KamelJulia LawrenceNeville Davidson
Credits/Source: World Journal of Surgical Oncology 2009, 7:84

 

http://7thspace.com/headlines/325075/late_cutaneous_metastases_to_the_face_from_malignant_pleural_mesothelioma_a_case_report_and_review_of_the_literature.html

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 

Malignant Mesothelioma Mortality ---United States, 1999--2005

Malignant mesothelioma is a fatal cancer primarily associated with exposure to asbestos. The latency period between first exposure to asbestos and clinical disease usually is 20--40 years (1). Although asbestos is no longer mined in theUnited States, the mineral is still imported, and a substantial amount of asbestos remaining in buildings eventually will be removed, either during remediation or demolition. Currently, an estimated 1.3 million construction and general industry workers potentially are being exposed to asbestos (2). To characterize mortality attributed to mesothelioma, CDC's National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health (NIOSH) analyzed annual multiple-cause-of-death records for 1999--2005, the most recent years for which complete data are available.* For those years, a total of 18,068 deaths of persons with malignant mesothelioma were reported, increasing from 2,482 deaths in 1999 to 2,704 in 2005, but the annual death rate was stable (14.1 per million in 1999 and 14.0 in 2005). Maintenance, renovation, or demolition activities that might disturb asbestos should be performed with precautions that sufficiently prevent exposures for workers and the public. In addition, physicians should document the occupational history of all suspected and confirmed mesothelioma cases.

Asbestos was used in a wide variety of construction and manufacturing applications through most of the 20th century. In the United States, asbestos use peaked at 803,000 metric tons in 1973 and then declined to approximately 1,700 metric tons in 2007 (Figure 1) (3).

For this report, malignant mesothelioma deaths were identified for 1999--2005 from death certificates and included any deaths for whichInternational Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision(ICD-10)codes for malignant mesothelioma were listed in the multiple-cause-of-death mortality data entityaxis.§ Because mesothelioma predominantly is associated with occupational exposure and has a long latency, the analysis was restricted to deaths of persons aged ≥25 years. The annual death rate per 1 million persons aged ≥25 years was calculated using the July 1 population estimates for each year provided by the U.S. Census Bureau. Overall death rates were calculated based on the 2002 census population.

During 1999--2005, a total of 18,068 malignant mesothelioma deaths were reported in theUnited States; 14,591 (80.8%) occurred among males and 17,180 (95.1%) among whites (Table). Mesothelioma deaths were classified as mesothelioma of pleura (1,572; 8.7%), peritoneum (657; 3.6%), other anatomical site (2,605; 14.4%), and unspecified anatomical site (13,454;74.5%). Mortality increased with age, with the greatest number of decedents aged ≥75 years; 311 deaths (1.7%) occurred in persons aged ≤44 years. From 1999 to 2005, the total number of malignant mesothelioma deaths increased 8.9%, from 2,482 in 1999 to 2,704 in 2005, but the annual death rate was stable (14.1 per million population in 1999 versus 14.0 in 2005). The death rate for males was 4.5 times that for females (23.2 versus 5.1 per million). During 1999--2005, the state death rate was greater than the national rate (13.8 per million population per year) in 26 states; in six states the rate exceeded 20 per million per year (Figure 2):Maine (173 deaths; rate: 27.5),Wyoming (50; 22.2),West Virginia (182; 21.0),Pennsylvania (1,210; 20.8),New Jersey (814; 20.2), andWashington (558; 20.1).

Reported by: KM Bang, PhD, JM Mazurek, MD, E Storey, MD, MD Attfield, PhD, PL Schleiff, MS, JM Wood, MS, Div of Respiratory Disease Studies, JT Wassell, PhD, Div of Safety Research, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, CDC.

Editorial Note:

Despite regulatory actions and the sharp decline in use of asbestos, potential exposure to asbestos continues, but most deaths from mesothelioma in theUnited States derive from exposures decades ago. Because mesothelioma manifests 20--40 years after first exposure, the number of mesothelioma deaths will likely peak by 2010 (4). The analysis described in this report indicates that the annual number of mesothelioma deaths is still increasing, and future cases will continue to reflect the extensive past use of asbestos. New cases also might result through occupational and environmental exposure to asbestos during remediation and demolition of existing asbestos in buildings if controls are insufficient to protect workers and the surrounding community.

The annual number of mesothelioma cases increased significantly from the late 1970s through the mid-1990s (4). Projections indicate that the number of mesothelioma cases involving males peaked during 2000--2004 at more than 2,000 cases and should be declining, with an expected return to background levels by 2055. The number of mesothelioma cases involving females (approximately 560 in 2003) is projected to increase slightly over time as a function of population size and shifting age distribution (4).

Previously, NIOSH examined industry and occupation data for 541 of the 2,482 mesothelioma deaths that occurred in 1999, the most recent year for which such data are available. After 1999, coding information for industry and occupation were no longer available. Of 130 industries reported, significant proportionate mortality ratios (PMRs) were found for ship and boat building and repairing (6.0; 95% confidence interval [CI] = 2.4--12.3); industrial and miscellaneous chemicals (4.8; CI = 2.9--7.5); petroleum refining (3.8; CI 1.2--8.9); electric light and power (3.1; CI = 1.5--5.7); and construction (1.6; CI = 1.2--1.9). Of 163 occupations reported, significant PMRs were found for plumbers, pipefitters, and steamfitters (4.8; CI = 2.8--7.5); mechanical engineers (3.0; CI = 1.1--6.6); electricians (2.4; CI = 1.3--4.2); and elementary school teachers (2.1; CI = 1.1--3.6) (5).

Over the decades, the Occupational Safety and Health Administration (OSHA) and the Environmental Protection Agency have taken various regulatory actions to control occupational exposure to asbestos (6). OSHA established a permissible exposure limit (PEL) for asbestos in 1971. This standard set the PEL at 12 fibers per cubic centimeter (f/cc) ofair.** This initial PEL was reduced to 5 f/cc in 1972, 2 f/cc in 1976, 0.2 f/cc in 1986, and 0.1 f/cc in 1994 (7). Inspection data for 1979--2003 show a general decline in asbestos exposure levels and in the percentage of samples exceeding designated occupational exposure limits in construction, manufacturing, mining, and other industries (5). However, in 2003, 20% of air samples collected in the construction industry exceeded the OSHA PEL (5).

The findings in this report are subject to at least three limitations. First, death certificates do not include information on exposure to asbestos or a specific work history. This limits identification of industries and occupations associated with mesothelioma. Second, the state of residence issuing death certificate might not always be the state in which the decedent's exposures occurred, which might affect state death rates. Finally, some mesothelioma cases might be misdiagnosed and assigned less specific ICD codes (e.g., ICD-10 code C76, malignant neoplasm of other and ill-defined sites), and consequently not be captured in this analysis (8).

Although asbestos has been eliminated in the manufacture of many products, it is still being imported (approximately 1,730 metric tons in 2007) and used in theUnited States (3) in various construction and transportation products (6). Ensuring a future decrease in mesothelioma mortality requires meticulous control of exposures to asbestos and other materials that might cause mesothelioma. Recent studies suggest that carbon nanotubes (fiber-shaped nanoparticles), which are increasingly being used in manufacturing (9), might share the carcinogenic mechanism postulated for asbestos and induce mesothelioma (10), underscoring the need for documentation of occupational history in future cases. Capturing occupational history information for mesothelioma cases is important to identify industries and occupations placing workers at risk for this lethal disease.

Acknowledgments

This report is based, in part, on contributions from G Syamlal, MBBS, and D Sharp, MD, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health, CDC.

References

  1. Lanphear BP, Buncher CR. Latent period for malignant mesothelioma of occupational origin. J Occup Med 1992;34:718--21.
  2. Occupational Safety and Health Administration. Safety and health topics: asbestos; 2009. Available at http://www.osha.gov/SLTC/asbestos.
  3. Kelly TD, Matos GR. Historical statistics for mineral and material commodities in theUnited States. US Geological Survey data series 140.Reston,VA: US Department of the Interior, US Geological Survey; 2005. Available athttp://minerals.usgs.gov/ds/2005/140.
  4. Price B, Ware A. Mesothelioma trends in theUnited States: an update based on surveillance, epidemiology, and end results program data for 1973 through 2003. Am J Epidemiol 2004;159:107--12.
  5. CDC. Work-related lung disease surveillance report 2007.Cincinnati,OH: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; 2008. Available athttp://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2008-143.
  6. Environmental Protection Agency. EPA asbestos materials bans: clarification.Washington,DC: Environmental Protection Agency; 1999. Available athttp://www.epa.gov/oppt/asbestos/pubs/asbbans2.pdf.
  7. Martonik JF, Nash E, Grossman E. The history of OSHA's asbestos rule makings and some distinctive approaches that they introduced for regulating occupational exposure to toxic substances. AIHAJ 2001;62:208--17.
  8. Gordon GJ, Jensen RV, Hsiao LL, et al. Translation of microarray data into clinically relevant cancer diagnostic tests using gene expression ratios in lung cancer and mesothelioma. Cancer Res 2002;62:4963--7.
  9. CDC. Approaches to safe nanotechnology. Managing the health and safety concerns associated with engineered nanomaterials.Cincinnati,OH: US Department of Health and Human Services, CDC, National Institute for Occupational Safety and Health; 2009. Available athttp://www.cdc.gov/niosh/docs/2009-125/pdfs/2009-125.pdf.
  10. Takagi A, Hirose A, Nishimura T, et al. Induction of mesothelioma in p53+/- mouse by intraperitoneal application of multi-wall carbon nanotube. J Toxicol Sci 2008;33:105--16.

* Since 1968, CDC'sNationalCenter for Health Statistics (NCHS) has compiled multiple-cause-of-death data annually from death certificates in theUnited States. CDC's NIOSH extracts information on deaths from occupationally related respiratory diseases and conditions from the NCHS data and stores the information in the National Occupational Respiratory Mortality System, available athttp://webappa.cdc.gov/ords/norms.html.

Codes C45.0 (mesothelioma of pleura), C45.1 (mesothelioma of peritoneum), C45.2 (mesothelioma of pericardium), C45.7 (mesothelioma of other sites), and C45.9 (mesothelioma, unspecified).

§ Entity axis includes information on all of the diseases, injuries, or medical complications, and the location (part, line, and sequence) of the information recorded on each certificate. Detail record layouts available athttp://www.cdc.gov/nchs/about/major/dvs/mcd/msb.htm.

The sum of individual site death totals is greater than the total number of deaths because some decedents have more than one site of mesothelioma listed on their death certificates.

** As an 8-hour time-weighted average based on the 1968 American Conference of Government Industrial Hygienists threshold limit value.

FIGURE 1. Asbestos use and permissible exposure limits* ---United States, 1900--2007

Asbestos use and permissible exposure limits* --- United States, 1900--2007

The figure above shows the amount of asbestos use, in thousands of metric tons, and the Occupational Safety and Health permissible asbsestos exposure limits in theUnited States during 1900–2007. Asbestos use increased from 1,000 metric tons in 1900 to a peak of 803,000 metric tons in 1973, then decreased to approximately 1,700 metric tons in 2007.

Permissible asbestos exposure limits were 12 fibers per cubic centimeter in 1971, 5 fibers in 1972, 2 fibers in 1976, 0.2 fibers in 1986, and 0.1 fibers in 1994.

* Arrows indicate year when the Occupational Safety and Health Administration permissible exposure limits were put in place (12 fibers per cubic centimeter [f/cc] in 1971, 5 f/cc in 1972, 2 f/cc in 1976, 0.2 f/cc in 1986, and 0.1 f/cc in 1994).

TABLE. Number of malignant mesothelioma deaths among persons aged ≥25 years, by selected characteristics ---United States, 1999--2005

Characteristic

No. of deaths, by year

1999

2000

2001

2002

2003

2004

2005

Total

Total

2,482

2,530

2,505

2,570

2,621

2,656

2,704

18,068

Death rate*

14.1

13.9

13.6

13.7

13.9

13.9

14.0

13.8

Age group (yrs)

25--34

4

6

7

10

7

11

6

51

35--44

33

34

39

40

38

42

34

260

45--54

138

131

144

106

148

121

118

906

55--64

388

372

361

380

386

400

438

2,725

65--74

818

814

748

764

715

674

735

5,268

75--84

888

918

942

975

1,028

1,097

1,014

6,862

≥85

213

255

264

295

299

311

359

1,996

Median age (yrs)

73

74

74

74

75

75

75

74

Sex

Male

1,993

2,043

2,019

2,126

2,122

2,140

2,148

14,591

Female

489

487

486

444

499

516

556

3,477

Race

White

2,353

2,398

2,405

2,447

2,481

2,535

2,561

17,180

Black

104

109

75

99

109

97

114

707

Other

25

23

25

24

31

24

29

181

Anatomical site

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Pleura

252

225

269

238

206

196

186

1,572

Peritoneum

92

84

83

95

95

101

107

657

Other

426

433

388

377

329

326

326

2,605

Unspecified

1,750

1,817

1,806

1,901

2,013

2,063

2,104

13,454

* Per 1 million population.

The sum of anatomical site totals (18,288) is greater than the total number of deaths (18,068) because some decedents have more than one site listed on their death certificate.

FIGURE 2. Malignant mesothelioma death rate per 1 million population,* by state --- United States, 1999--2005

Malignant mesothelioma death rate per 1 million population,* by state --- United States, 1999--2005

The figure above shows a map of theUnited States and indicates the malignant mesothelioma death rate per 1 million population for each state during 1999–2005. The state death rate was greater than the national rate of 13.8 per million population per year in 26 states; in six states (Maine, New Jersey, Pennsylvania, Washington, Wyoming, and West Virginia) the rate exceeded 20 per million per year.

* Decedents for whom theInternational Classification of Diseases, 10th Revision codes C45.0 (mesothelioma of pleura), C45.1 (mesothelioma of peritoneum), C45.2 (mesothelioma of pericardium), C45.7 (mesothelioma of other sites), or C45.9 (mesothelioma, unspecified) were listed on death certificates were identified using CDC mortality data for 1999--2005.

Use of trade names and commercial sources is for identification only and does not imply endorsement by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services.


References to non-CDC sites on the Internet are provided as a service toMMWR readers and do not constitute or imply endorsement of these organizations or their programs by CDC or the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services. CDC is not responsible for the content of pages found at these sites. URL addresses listed inMMWR were current as of the date of publication.

AllMMWR HTML versions of articles are electronic conversions from typeset documents. This conversion might result in character translation or format errors in the HTML version. Users are referred to the electronic PDF version (http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr) and/or the originalMMWR paper copy for printable versions of official text, figures, and tables. An original paper copy of this issue can be obtained from the Superintendent of Documents, U.S. Government Printing Office (GPO),Washington,DC20402-9371; telephone: (202) 512-1800. Contact GPO for current prices.

**Questions or messages regarding errors in formatting should be addressed to mmwrq@cdc.gov.

Date last reviewed: 4/22/2009

http://www.cdc.gov/mmwr/preview/mmwrhtml/mm5815a3.htm

 
Share this: facebook twitter linkedin reddit stumble delicious mixx digg yahoo
 
 
 
 
 
 
 
35 Related Videos
 
Pleural Mesothelioma: a foreseable and avoidable death
10:01

Pleural Mesothelioma: a foreseable and avoidabledeath

Epidemiologic observations on an anatomical-pathologic and clinic case study from 1997 to 2006 - Service of Preventive Medicine (Head: Dr. Gerardo...

 
 
My Wife Was Murdered
8:45

My Wife Was Murdered

Wife died of Mesothelioma

 
 
Spodden Valley, asbestos scandal (part 1)
9:55

Spodden Valley, asbestos scandal (part 1)

Rochdale,North westEngland 1982. A scandalous company cover up in a site that processed Canadian chrysotile asbestos from the 1870s thru to the...

 
Canada blocks asbestos banAdded to
4:54

Canada blocksasbestos ban

More at therealnews.com UN Rotterdam treaty on toxic trade restrictions marred byCanada's stance onasbestos

 
Asbestos in building construction 1959
2:26

Asbestos in building construction 1959

This was clipped from the 1959 film,Asbestos a matter of time, by the US Bureau of Mines, Department of the Interior.

 
 
 
 
MP: "Fireproof Cotton Rock" - Asbestos in China Found by Marco PoloAdded to
2:22

MP: "Fireproof Cotton Rock" -Asbestos in China Found by Marco Polo

MARCO POLO: THECHINA MYSTERY REVEALED Did Marco Polo Really Discover Asbestos?

 
 
 
 
 
1965 Armstong asbestos tile commercial
1:16

1965 Armstongasbestos tile commercial

n 1860, Thomas M. Armstrong, the son of Scotish-Irish immigrants from Londonderry, joined with John D. Glass to open a one-room shop in Pittsburgh...

 
 
Asbestos in electrical work 1959
0:58

Asbestos in electrical work 1959

This was clipped from the 1959 film, Asbestos a matter of time, by the US Bureau of Mines, Department of the Interior. For more information about...

 
Asbestos The Silent Killer Part 1 of 3
8:45

Asbestos The Silent Killer Part 1 of 3

Produced by United Steelworkers Local 480 at the Teck Cominco Smelter in Trail, BC, this hard-hitting documentary examines the devastating human...

 
 
Asbestos Tragedy Libby Montana 2004 USEPA
2:36

Asbestos Tragedy Libby Montana 2004 USEPA

Processed vermiculite from the WR Grace Libby MT Mine contained tremolite, a form of asbestos, that was allowed to contaminate local

 
 
Summerlin Rd, Asbestos found, Fox News.wmv
2:10

Summerlin Rd,Asbestos found, FoxNews.wmv

Summerlin Rdasbestos found. Reported by FoxNews..

 
 
 
 
 
 
Video: Old Promotional Film For AsbestosAdded to
Quicklist
3:45

Video: Old Promotional Film ForAsbestos

www.searchmesothelioma.net Both the government and corporate industry used promotional newsreel type films during the 1950s and 1960s to promote...

 
Introduction to Asbestos from 1959Added to
Quicklist
2:30

Introduction toAsbestos from 1959

This clip is from the 1959 film, "Asbestos: a Matter of Time," by the Bureau of Mines (US Department of the Interior.) The entire film is..

 
 
 
 


4:38

About theAsbestos DiseaseAwareness Organization (ADAO)
Asbestos DiseaseAwareness Organization, ADAO, Linda Reinstein, BanAsbestos, www.adao.us

 

8:31
mesothelioma
Mesothelioma is an incurableasbestos cancer. This short film was produced to raiseawareness of the issues around mesothelioma. It...

 

 
 
 
      Home | About Us | Contact Us | Privacy Policy      

Disclaimer:
Please Contact a physician with regard to health concerns.
The materials contained on this AsbestosNewsdaily.com are for informational purposes only and do not constitute health or medical advice. Use of information on this site does not create or constitute any kind of agreement or contract between you and the owners or users of this site, the owners of the servers upon which it is housed, or anyone else who is in any way connected with this site.
Many links on Asbestosnewsdaily.com lead to other sites. AsbestosNewdaily.com does not sponsor, endorse or otherwise approve of the materials appearing in such sites. Nor is Asbestosnewsdaily.com responsible for dead or misdirected links.
IF YOU NEED A LINK OR TEXT REMOVED FROM THIS PAGE PLEASE CONTACT removenews@asbestosnewsdaily.com. We will do our best to accommodate your request.

    Copyright 2009 - 2017
All Rights Reserved. AsbestosNewsDaily.com
   
      Mesothelioma Lawyer