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Mesothelioma – Asbestos Legislation – Mesothelioma Lawsuits

Texas legislation would expediteMesothelioma lawsuits

June 20th, 2009 by Wendi Lewis

 

bill 100x100 Texas legislation would expedite mesothelioma
lawsuits

 

According to a report in Risk & Insurance magazine,legislation currently pending in theTexas Senate would make it easier for people withmesothelioma lawsuits to have their day in court.Senate Bill 1123, which is sponsored by Senator Robert Duncan (R-Lubbock) would eliminate the need for Mesothelioma victims to prove exactly how much asbestos they had been exposed to as the source of their cancer.

 

Mesothelioma is a rare but deadly cancer caused by asbestos exposure. It most often affects the lining of the lungs, but can also affect the lining of the abdomen or, more rarely, the heart.

 

A 2007 Texas Supreme Court ruling in an asbestosis case requires victims of asbestos disease to show exactly how much asbestos they were exposed to in order to prove causation. Asbestosis is a severe scarring of the lungs caused by exposure to asbestos. The standards in this ruling are currently also applied tomesothelioma lawsuits.

 

Sen. Duncan argues that the same standards of causation cannot be applied tomesothelioma cases, because of the usually long latency period of the disease. It can sometimes take decades from the point of asbestos exposure until the disease manifests with symptoms. As a result, it is often extremely difficult for plaintiffs to trace back to the source of their exposure and secure qualitative proof of the exact amount of exposure.

 

Senate Bill 1123 would use what is known as the “Lohrmann standard,” which requires amesothelioma plaintiff to “prove that exposure to asbestos was frequent, regular and proximal.” The bill would not affect the standard for asbestosis cases.

Some argue that the law will be too lenient, but Risk & Insurance quotes Sen. Duncan as saying the rule will only bringTexas in line with the standard used most widely throughout the rest of the country to determine causation inmesothelioma cases.

 

http://www.mesothelioma.law.pro/news/2009/06/20/texas-legislation-would-expedite-mesothelioma-lawsuits/
 
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Asbestos Legislation – Asbestos Legislation – Mesothelioma

 

HOOSIERS DYING OF ASBESTOS EXPOSURE SAY LAW CHANGE IS NEEDED

By EricBradner
Updated Thursday, October 1, 2009

INDIANAPOLIS — Before she dies, Dorothy Kuykendall wants her day in court.

 

The 76-year-old fromTerre Haute was exposed to asbestos, a toxin that can lead to a deadly cancer calledmesothelioma, more than three decades ago when she handled the material regularly as a worker at the city’sGlas-Col Apparatus Co.

This April, she learned thatshe is dying of cancer. Even though she hasn’t handled asbestos since 1975, her doctors say that exposure is the cause.

“I didn’t know then that asbestos was dangerous, or that my work would one day cause me to have this awful cancer,” she said.

State statute gives Hoosiers only 10 years to file a lawsuit after contact with harmful materials. SinceIndiana doesn’t make an exception for those with latent diseases, she has no recourse.

Kuykendall can’t get workers’ compensation, and she can’t sue. Therefore, Medicare is on the hook for hundreds of thousands of dollars inmedical expenses as a result of her disease.

“My family and the taxpayers are paying for the actions of thecompany that sold asbestos and my former employer,” she said. “It’s just not fair.”

Kuykendall was part of a group of advocates who asked a panel of state lawmakers on Thursday topass legislation that would allow those who develop diseases caused by asbestos decades after being exposed to sue the companies responsible for the exposure.

Her voice cracked as she told the Commission on the Courts, an out-of-session study committee, of her disappointment that she won’t be able to take care of her husband, who is 89, until he dies. “He’s taking care of me,” she said. “And I wonder what will happen to him when I’m gone.

“I ask that you change the law to give people like us some hope,” she said.

Under currentIndiana law, those who are exposed tohazardous materials such as asbestos have up to 10 years to file a lawsuit.

However, asbestos diseases – most prominently,mesothelioma – can take much longer to develop, meaning that by the time the illness is discovered and diagnosed, the chance to take legal action has already passed.

Indiana is the only state that doesn’t have a law on the books allowing for exceptions for latent diseases, according to RussellSipes, an attorney who testified Thursday and who represents clients who suffer fromasbestos-related diseases.

The legislation he called for would maintain the state’s current 10-year window, but would carve out an exception that allows Hoosiers who are beyond that time frame to sue within two years of being diagnosed.

It’s an exception the General Assembly approved in 1989. However, a 2003 state Supreme Court ruling drastically altered the meaning of that law, rendering it essentially useless,Sipes said.

“It’s obvious – people who become ill never have a right to sue,” he said. “They become sick and often they die long after the time the Legislature has set for them to bring a cause of action to try to hold anyone responsible.”

One person who called for the new law was a state lawmaker himself.

Sen. John Waterman, R-Shelburn, told his colleagues that in the 1960s, he worked for a company that removed agingboilers fromhomes and businesses. He described a white cloud formed by asbestos surrounding him as he took a sledgehammer to theboilers.

“On the way out, the truck was never covered. You’d have awhite cloud of dust all the way out to the landfills,” he said. “A lot of friends I’ve worked with have passed since.”

The committee’s chairwoman, Rep. Linda Lawson, D-Hammond, said she expects her panel to recommend that the General Assembly pass a bill allowing for the two-year exemption for latent diseases during the 2010 session.

Tony Payton, a 63-year-oldLouisville,Ky. resident, told the committee that he and his family would be bankrupt if he had the misfortune of living just across theOhio River inIndiana. However, inKentucky, he went to court and won a settlement.

Payton had surgery to removecancer caused by asbestos, but this summer was told that the cancer has returned.

He said he was there to testify on behalf of a friend who was a member of the same union in the 1960s and 1970s, but like roughly one-third of that union’s members, lived in southernIndiana.

“I’m still here, still fighting, still alive, and today I’m here to speak for [my friend],” he said.

http://m.courierpress.com/news/2009/oct/01/hoosiers-dying-asbestos-exposure-say-law-change-ne/
 
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Asbestos Legislation– Asbestos Company – Asbestos Lawsuit

 

Asbestos Suits Become More Widespread

 

Sep 26, 2002 | The Los Angeles Times

 

Asbestos litigation has ensnared more than 6,000 companies--triple previous estimates--and is affecting nearly every industry, a Rand Institute study said Wednesday.

U.S. companies have paid out $54 billion on more than 600,000asbestos injury claims filed since the early 1970s, the Rand Institute for Civil Justice reported. Asbestos claims ultimately could cost as much as $210 billion, according to projections cited in the study, and more than 60 companies--22 of them in the last two years--have sought bankruptcy protection to staunch their losses.

The rising cost of the lawsuits has brought calls for reforms, and on Wednesday corporate defenders, insurers and lawyers for asbestos-related cancer victims seized on theRand report as evidence of the need for change in a hearing on asbestos litigation before the Senate Judiciary Committee.

The hearing coincided with this week's opening of a massive class-action suit inWest Virginia involving more than 5,000 plaintiffs and dozens of corporations including Exxon Mobil Corp., Owens-Illinois Inc., Westinghouse Electric Corp. and Union Carbide, now part of Dow Chemical Co.

In a measure of the breadth of the litigation, Rand found asbestos suits had been filed against companies in 75 of 83 industry sectors tracked by the government, said Stephen Carroll, the Rand senior economist who headed the study.

"The bankruptcies are the tip of the iceberg," Carroll said. "Under the surface there are a lot of corporations that are being hit hard by asbestos liabilities and they are putting their money into compensation payments instead of investment."

TheRand study also renewed questions about whether the growing pile of lawsuits is benefiting the victims of asbestos. Despite the enormous economic costs, the authors conclude that asbestos litigation is failing to adequately compensate the most seriously ill victims and no longer poses a deterrent to the pursuit of profits at the expense of worker health.

After the costs of litigation, asbestos claimants now receive 43 cents of every dollar spent on asbestos compensation, a slight improvement over the 37 cents thatRand researchers said reached plaintiffs' pockets 20 years ago. At the same time, the most seriously ill victims--people with lung cancer and mesothelioma, an incurable asbestos-related cancer--get little more than a third of all payouts, the study said.

The study echoes others' concerns that a surge in claims in the last four years from people who may have been exposed to asbestos but are not sick is draining money away from cancer victims who have high medical expenses and are no longer able to earn a living.

"The system looks worse 20 years later," said Deborah Hensler, aStanfordUniversity law professor who contributed toRand's first asbestos litigation study in 1982 and to its latest. "The system [in 1982], however inefficiently, was performing its job of corrective justice. It was making the bad guys pay. And by making the bad guys pay, the system was sending a very strong message to other potential bad guys working with other products that 'If you engage in this kind of behavior, you might find yourself in bankruptcy.' "

Today, Hensler said, high legal costs and payouts to claimants without serious injuries are diverting money away from cancer victims, and corporateAmerica no longer believes that only the most culpable companies pay.

Because litigation has spread to hundreds of companies outside the asbestos mining and manufacturing business, Hensler said, executives of recently targeted companies are saying, " 'This is not fair. We are being asked to pay for something that other blame-worthy companies did.' "

Fred Baron, a pioneering asbestos lawyer fromTexas and a recent president of the Assn. of Trial Lawyers of America, disputed the idea that "uninvolved companies" are being unfairly swept into the fray.

"While these companies did not manufacture asbestos, they used, distributed or otherwise sold products to others knowing that their asbestos content was likely to injure downstream users," Baron said. "Other defendants purchased companies, often at a discount, knowing these companies had substantial asbestos liability."

Baron's comments came during the Judiciary Committee hearing.

But Steve Kazan, anOakland lawyer who represents only cancer victims, told the committee that unless Congress steps in, there will be no money left to compensate people who fall victim to asbestos cancers over the next 50 years.

An estimated 27 million workers were heavily exposed to asbestos between 1940 and 1973. But, because mesothelioma can take 40 years or more to appear, at least 2,500 new cases are diagnosed each year, and the disease is widely expected to claim hundreds of thousands of lives in 30 to 50 years.

To preserve funds for future mesothelioma victims,Kazan has taken the unusual position of joining corporations and insurers inproposing that Congress establish medical thresholds that would bar claims from people who are not functionally impaired. Otherasbestos reform efforts have failed over the years, and, despite more than a year of lobbying, the latest idea has not found its way into a bill.

Baron, testifying on behalf of the trial lawyers association, urged the congressional committee to continue its restraint, saying the proposed reforms would harm the rights of most asbestos victims.

"Although they will argue that the only way to pay more to the sickest is by paying less to others, the defendants' real goal is to pay less total asbestos compensation," Baron said. "The concept that a victim must be impaired before their claim can be heard is an invention of the asbestos defendants designed to limit their liability."

Sen. Patrick J. Leahy (D-Vt.), who chairs the committee, said he was interested in coming up with a bill that would respond to the neediest victims, but he said the committee was unlikely to take it up before Congress adjourns for the year.

 

TheLos Angeles Times

 
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Asbestos Legislation – Asbestos Deaths

Asbestos Diseases Viewed As 'Epidemic'

Study finds 100,000 will die in 10 years

Mar 4, 2004 | Star Ledger

 

TheUnited States is facing an "epidemic" of asbestos-caused diseases, with some 100,000 people expected to die in the next decade from their past exposure to the dangerous substance, according an analysis of health data by an environmental organization. 

"Ten thousand Americans die each year a rate approaching 30 deaths per day from diseases caused by asbestos," said a report to be issued today by the Environmental Working Group Action Fund. 

"Asbestos kills thousands more people than skin cancer each year, and nearly the number that are slain in assaults with firearms," said the environmental group. 

The study comes as theSenate is preparing to debate legislation that would nullify tens of thousands of asbestos lawsuits and transfer all pending and future claims to a newly created $108 billion victims compensation fund financed by manufacturers and insurance companies. 

TheSenate is expected to take up this bill at the end of this month or in early April. The measure is backed by the business community, which is seeking to cap its liability and get out from under a flood of lawsuits, but it faces opposition from organized labor and trial lawyers who argue the fund will shortchange victims. 

The report, based on an analysis of more than two decades of government mortality records and epidemiological studies, said the 20- to 50-year latency period for asbestos diseases means that a substantial portion of individuals exposed in the 1960s and 1970s are now just showing up. 

"EWG Action Fund projects that over the next decade, fourasbestos-related diseases 
mesothelioma, asbestosis, lung cancer and gastrointestinal cancer will claim the lives of over 100,000 Americans," said the report. 

"The epidemic is national in scope, affecting every state. And for every life claimed, many more will be compromised by an array of serious, if nonfatal, asbestos-caused illnesses," the report said. 

The study notes thatNew Jersey was a prime destination for asbestos mined inMontana, with some 338,000 tons shipped to the state between 1948 and 1993 for use in factories such as the Johns Manville plant inSomersetCounty and W.R. Grace plants in Edgewater andTrenton. 

The environmental group said the government data showed at least 2,775 people inNew Jersey were killed by asbestos from 1979 to 2001, the sixth-highest total among the 50 states. It added that its research suggests the number of deaths could be as much as double that figure because of chronic misdiagnosis of asbestosis and mesothelioma and the absence of federal tracking for mesothelioma for nearly all the time period analyzed. 

Asbestos is a fibrous mineral that was once used widely in many industrial processes because of its fire-retardant and insulating properties. The report said in the mid-1970s, more than 3,000 consumer and industrial products contained asbestos, asbestos product factories polluted neighborhoods and workers were heavily exposed on the job. 

When inhaled, asbestos fibers can cause lung disease and cancer. As a result, its use has been sharply curtailed in recent years, though it is still found in vehicle braking systems, asphalt roof coatings and gaskets. 

EWG Action Fund, a nonprofit, nonpartisan public interest group that focuses on researching toxins in the environment, said in its report that hazardous conditions persist today, even in workplaces where asbestos use is regulated. 

Asbestos diseases overwhelmingly affect older men, according to the study. It found deaths from asbestos have been increasing steadily for the last 20 years in theUnited States, are still on the rise and will peak around 2015. 

The study also said the highest death toll has come from asbestosis and mesothelioma. But it said the mortality rate of asbestosis was three times greater than the rate of mesothelioma between 1979 and 2001. 

More than 625,000 people have filed lawsuits for asbestos-related injuries over the years. By the end of 2000, businesses and insurers had paid out more than $54 billion in claims, according to a 2002 Rand Corp. study. 

Rand found that more than 300,000 cases were still pending and another 500,000 to 2.4 million claims could be filed in the years ahead, costing businesses upward of $210 billion. There are more than 3,000 asbestos lawsuits pending in theNew Jersey court system. 

In addition, 67 companies have filed for bankruptcy because of their asbestos liabilities, and additional companies are likely to seek Chapter 11 protection. 

The defunct New Jersey-based Johns-Manville Corp. was the world's largest producer of asbestos when it declared bankruptcy in 1982 after being overwhelmed by lawsuits from people who had become sick from asbestos exposure. The company established a trust fund in 1988 that is paying only 5 percent of the value of the claims against it to reserve funds for future victims. As of October, the fund had settled 570,000 damage claims for $3.2 billion and had 43,000 claims pending. 

One major bankruptcy case now pending in federal court inNew Jersey involves five companies -- W.R. Grace, Owens-Corning, Armstrong World, U.S. Gypsum and Federal Mogul. All five firms sought bankruptcy protection after facing huge claims from those injured by asbestos exposure. 

Two years ago, U.S. District Judge Alfred Wolin was assigned to try to resolve the extremely complicated case, but tactics he employed to move it along have been challenged by some of the parties who want him removed from the case. A federal appeals court is reviewing that issue.

 

Star Ledger
 
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Asbestos Legislative History

June 18, 2002
S. 2641: Ban Asbestos inAmerica Act of 2002

May 22, 2003
S. 1115: Ban Asbestos inAmerica Act of 2003

May 22, 2003
H.R. 2277: Ban Asbestos inAmerica Act of 2003

March 17, 2005
S.Res. 43: A resolution designating the first day of April 2005 as "National Asbestos Awareness Day"

March 15, 2006
S.Res. 402: A resolution designating the first day of April, 2006, as "National Asbestos Awareness Day"

March 3, 2007
S. 742: Ban Asbestos in America Act of 2007

March 29, 2007
S.Res. 131: A resolution designating the first week of April 2007 as "National Asbestos Awareness Week"

June, 12, 2007
EPW Hearing: “Examination of the Health Effects of Asbestos and Methods of Mitigating Such Impacts”
 
August 1, 2007
H.R. 3285: Ban Asbestos in America Act of 2007

August 2, 2007
H.R. 3339: Bruce Vento Ban Asbestos and Prevent Mesothelioma Act of 2007 

August 2, 2007
U.S. Senate Environment and Public Works Committee votes S. 742 out of committee

October 4, 2007
S. 742: Ban Asbestos in America Act of 2007 passed in the Senate by unanimous consent

2007: The Senate unanimously passed “Ban Asbestos in America Act” however the ban language was changed from banning asbestos containing products to only banning asbestos containing materials which would also exempt materials containing less than one percent asbestos.

2007:“Bruce Vento Ban Asbestos and Prevent Mesothelioma Act of 2007” introduced by U.S. House of Representative Betty McCollum.

2008:U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Environment and Hazardous Materials introduced H.R. 6903, the “Bruce Vento Ban Asbestos and Prevent Mesothelioma Act of 2008”, banning Asbestos Containing Products (ACP).

February 15, 2008
U.S. House of Representatives introduces the EHM Committee Print

February 28, 2008
U.S. House of Representatives Subcommittee on Environment and Hazardous Materials of the Committee on Energy and Commerce Legislative Hearing onS. 742 and Draft Legislation to Ban Asbestos in Products

March 5, 2008
S.Res. 462: A resolution designating the first week of April 2008 as "National Asbestos Awareness Week"

May 19, 2007
U.S. House of Representatives Staff Briefing (Majority) - Subcommittee on Environment and Hazardous Materials of the Committee on Energy and Commerce

May 28, 2008
“Committee to Ban Asbestos in America” launches www.BanAsbestos.us

September 15, 2008
H.R.6903: To amend the Toxic Substances Control Act to reduce the health risks posed by asbestos-containing products, and for other purposes.

March 5, 2009
S.RES.57: A resolution designating the first week of April 2009 as “National Asbestos Awareness Week”

April 1, 2009
Statement from Acting Surgeon General Steven K. Galson about National Asbestos Week

 

http://www.banasbestos.us/leghistory/default.aspx

 
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ADAO Encouraged by Energy and Commerce Subcommittee’s Hearing on “Prioritizing Chemicals for Safety Determination”

© Business Wire 2009 - 2009-11-17 17:45:06

The Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) today announced that it is encouraged by the Energy and Commerce Subcommittee on Commerce, Trade, and Consumer Protection’s Hearing on “Prioritizing Chemicals for Safety Determination”. The hearing examined the options for prioritizing chemicals for safety determinations in the event that the Committee amends the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA).

This development is preceded by the Surgeon General’s statement earlier this year acknowledging that there is no safe level of asbestos exposure, and the Environmental Protection Agency (EPA)’s recommendation to amend the Toxic Substances Control Act (TSCA) to further protect citizens against dangerous chemicals such as asbestos.

In addition, ADAO’s own product testing in 2007 revealed that asbestos continues to be used in consumer products, including children’s toys. As a result of the independent investigation, the CSI: Crime Scene Investigation TM Fingerprint Examination Kit toy was pulled from store shelves just before the holidays.

“As the largest victims’ organization, ADAO agrees with the World Health Organization, International Labour Organization (ILO), EPA andU.S.

Surgeon General, that there is no safe level of asbestos exposure,” stated ADAO Executive Director, Linda Reinstein. “We need to move from consumer protection to the prohibition of deadly chemicals. Since 1976, scientific and medical studies have proved asbestos is a human carcinogen. Our 2007 ADAO product testing results confirmed without a doubt that asbestos remains a threat. It is critically important to amend TSCA and ban asbestos now.”

About Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization

Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO) was founded by asbestos victims and their families in 2004. ADAO seeks to give asbestos victims a united voice to help ensure that their rights are fairly represented and protected, and raise public awareness about the dangers of asbestos exposure and the often deadly asbestos related diseases. ADAO is funded through voluntary contributions and staffed by volunteers. For more information visit www.asbestosdiseaseawareness.org : .


Asbestos Disease Awareness Organization (ADAO)Doug LarkinDirector

of Communications202-391-1546 mailto:doug@asbestosdiseaseawareness.org

http://www.pr-inside.com/adao-encouraged-by-energy-and-commerce-r1588173.htm

 
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Asbestos Disease Compensation Law moves a Step Closer to Victory

Posted on October 21st, 2009 by Deon Scott in All News

There has been a move forward in the UK with regards to a Bill that is aimed at restoring compensation claim rights for victims of pleural plaques, which is a condition caused by exposure to asbestos, and while not life threatening can pose serious problems and develop into something more dangerous such as malignant mesothelioma.

A private members Bill was passed through the House of Commons earlier this week, and its next step will be to go to the House of Lords. If the Bill goes through, victims ofasbestos exposure who are suffering from pleural plaques will be able to claim the compensation that they feel they are entitled to but which insurance firms have claimed does not justify a payout.

A ruling made by law lords two years ago resulted in sufferers of pleural plaques losing the right to claim for compensation, but campaigners have been lobbying hard to get these rights restored, and this could prove to be a major step forward in that fight.

One MP that is backing the Bill said: “I was bitterly disappointed by the Law Lords’ decision that the lung scarring caused by asbestos isn’t worthy of compensation. I will always maintain that pleural plaques is a working injury, which deserves compensation. I look forward to supporting the Private Members’ Bill in Parliament, which in effect overturns the Law Lords’ ruling. Should the Bill fail to garner enough support among MPs, then I will be pressing the Prime Minister to take decisive action to end the needless wrangling over compensation.”

http://www.bloggernews.net/122677

 
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Calls for Changes toIndiana Mesothelioma Laws

Posted on October 8th, 2009

by Deon Scott in All News

A number of people have been calling for changes to be made to mesothelioma laws in the state ofIndiana, stating that workers need to have more time to make a compensation claim against those that exposed them to the deadly carcinogenic, asbestos, which can cause asbestos cancer as well as a range of other serious health problems.

One of the people that is campaigning for these changes is Dorothy Kuykendall who claims to have been exposed to asbestos when working at a factor some decades ago. She said that she always thought that she would be able to take care of her older husband in his later years but that this was not going to happen.

She stated: “My husband is 13 years older than I am, and I was sure I would be able to take care of him until he died, but that’s not going to happen. He’s caring for me, and with all my medical bills, I’m afraid he won’t have enough income to live in our home.”

Another woman that is campaigning for the changes to the law said: “Jim was a husband, a father and a grandfather. I am angry with my state, that the state sees no value in my husband’s life and death or the economic hardships our family now suffers. On behalf of all the other families who have lost loved ones to this awful disease, I beg you to recognize us and at least have a chance to find out who is responsible for what happened.”

http://www.bloggernews.net/122526

 
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Hoosiers dying of asbestos exposure say law change is needed

  • By Eric Bradner
  • Posted October 1, 2009 at 6:15 p.m.

Article Highlights

  • Hoosiers who are dying from a form of cancer caused by asbestos exposure asked state lawmakers on Thursday to pass a new law that would allow them to sue the companies responsible for their exposure.

— Before she dies, Dorothy Kuykendall wants her day in court.

The 76-year-old fromTerre Haute was exposed to asbestos, a toxin that can lead to a deadly cancer called mesothelioma, more than three decades ago when she handled the material regularly as a worker at the city’s Glas-Col Apparatus Co.

This April, she learned that she is dying of cancer. Even though she hasn’t handled asbestos since 1975, her doctors say that exposure is the cause.

“I didn’t know then that asbestos was dangerous, or that my work would one day cause me to have this awful cancer,” she said.

State statute gives Hoosiers only 10 years to file a lawsuit after contact with harmful materials. SinceIndiana doesn’t make an exception for those with latent diseases, she has no recourse.

Kuykendall can’t get workers’ compensation, and she can’t sue. Therefore, Medicare is on the hook for hundreds of thousands of dollars in medical expenses as a result of her disease.

“My family and the taxpayers are paying for the actions of the company that sold asbestos and my former employer,” she said. “It’s just not fair.”

Kuykendall was part of a group of advocates who asked a panel of state lawmakers on Thursday to pass legislation that would allow those who develop diseases caused by asbestos decades after being exposed to sue the companies responsible for the exposure.

Her voice cracked as she told the Commission on the Courts, an out-of-session study committee, of her disappointment that she won’t be able to take care of her husband, who is 89, until he dies. “He’s taking care of me,” she said. “And I wonder what will happen to him when I’m gone.

“I ask that you change the law to give people like us some hope,” she said.

Under currentIndiana law, those who are exposed to hazardous materials such as asbestos have up to 10 years to file a lawsuit.

However, asbestos diseases – most prominently, mesothelioma – can take much longer to develop, meaning that by the time the illness is discovered and diagnosed, the chance to take legal action has already passed.

Indiana is the only state that doesn’t have a law on the books allowing for exceptions for latent diseases, according to Russell Sipes, an attorney who testified Thursday and who represents clients who suffer from asbestos-related diseases.

The legislation he called for would maintain the state’s current 10-year window, but would carve out an exception that allows Hoosiers who are beyond that time frame to sue within two years of being diagnosed.

It’s an exception the General Assembly approved in 1989. However, a 2003 state Supreme Court ruling drastically altered the meaning of that law, rendering it essentially useless, Sipes said.

“It’s obvious – people who become ill never have a right to sue,” he said. “They become sick and often they die long after the time the Legislature has set for them to bring a cause of action to try to hold anyone responsible.”

One person who called for the new law was a state lawmaker himself.

Sen. John Waterman, R-Shelburn, told his colleagues that in the 1960s, he worked for a company that removed aging boilers from homes and businesses. He described a white cloud formed by asbestos surrounding him as he took a sledgehammer to the boilers.

“On the way out, the truck was never covered. You’d have a white cloud of dust all the way out to the landfills,” he said. “A lot of friends I’ve worked with have passed since.”

The committee’s chairwoman, Rep. Linda Lawson, D-Hammond, said she expects her panel to recommend that the General Assembly pass a bill allowing for the two-year exemption for latent diseases during the 2010 session.

Tony Payton, a 63-year-oldLouisville,Ky. resident, told the committee that he and his family would be bankrupt if he had the misfortune of living just across the Ohio River inIndiana. However, inKentucky, he went to court and won a settlement.

Payton had surgery to remove cancer caused by asbestos, but this summer was told that the cancer has returned.

He said he was there to testify on behalf of a friend who was a member of the same union in the 1960s and 1970s, but like roughly one-third of that union’s members, lived in southernIndiana.

“I’m still here, still fighting, still alive, and today I’m here to speak for [my friend],” he said

http://www.courierpress.com/news/2009/oct/01/hoosiers-dying-asbestos-exposure-say-law-change-ne/
 
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Updated 09/03/2009 06:27 PM

Building Safety Bills Become Law

By: NY1 News



Mayor Michael Bloomberg signed four bills today designed to improve safety and oversight at construction, demolition, and asbestos sites in the city.

The mayor says the bills are a response to theDeutscheBankBuilding fire in 2007 which killed two firefighters.

In response, the mayor put together a panel comprised of representatives from the Department of Buildings, Department of Environmental Protection, the New York Fire Department and Office of Operations, which came up with recommendations that became the basis for the bills.

"The bills before me today relate to two specific areas: enforcing safety at construction and demolition sites and strengthening standpipe and sprinkler safety," said the mayor. "Construction work has inherent risks but these bills will mitigate those risks and better protect emergency responders, workers and the public."

Five other related bills were signed into law in June.

The mayor also signed today a bill that provides language assistance in pharmacies and another that makes an airline food industry company eligible for state benefits, enabling the company to stay in the city.

http://ny1.com/1-all-boroughs-news-content/top_stories/105159/building-safety-bills-become-law/
 
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Asbestos legislation proposal welcomed

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Published Date:
08 July 2009 - By Kevin Mullan

THE widow of former Mayor of Londonderry Tony Carlin - who died of mesothelioma six years ago - has welcomed a recommendation to have the law changed to allow people suffering from the effects of asbestos exposure claim compensation.

Mary Carlin has campaigned vigorously for sufferers of abestos-related diseases in her role with the voluntary Victims of Asbestos North West Group (VANWG) since the death of her husband at just 56-years-of-age in 2003.

She told the Sentinel she wasdelighted at the recommendation by outgoing Finance minister Nigel Dodds that the law be changed to allow those suffering from pleural plaques - considered by officialdom on the lower-rung of asbestos-related ailments - claim for compensation for their injuries.
Pleural plaques are small areas of scarring on the lungs which are benign, but are an indicator of exposure to asbestos. They can signify an increased risk of developing more severe forms of illness such as asbestosis or mesothelioma.


A change to the law would mean people who have been negligently exposed to asbestos, most often through their work and have been diagnosed with pleural plaques, will be able to seek compensation through the courts. Mrs Carlin says she has been contacted by four new cases of men suffering form pleural plaques since the start of this year. Due to heavy concentrations of asbestos in industrial plants inLondonderry and in buildings constructed here up until the 1980s Mrs Carlin believes the asbestos time-bomb is still ticking as it can take between 20 to 40 years for the disease to develop.


She also said people with pleural plaques often suffer from severe breathing problems, are forced to take medication and can suffer from a poorer quality of life. They are deserving of compensation and Mr Dodds' statement is welcome, she said. "I'm delighted to hear this. It gives people great hope that we'll see a change in the law to allow people with pleural plaques receive compensation," said Mrs Carlin.

"Quite a few people have come forward to us - a lot of men in their fifties. Since the start of this year we've been contacted by four men with pleural plaques. And I think they are entitled to support. People's lives are affected by it with breathing problems and reliance on medication.

"A few years ago the law lords decided it was a less severe form of asbestos-related illness and changed the law but I know they've been campaigning to have that changed inEngland and I'm really pleased to hear they are now recommending it here," she added.


Mr Dodds said: "We now know just how dangerous asbestos is, but for many years it was used in a range of commercial products, and even in buildings, because of its resistance to heat. Many people who have been exposed to asbestos, usually through their work, have gone on to develop conditions because of that exposure."
Mr Dodds has heard individual testimonies about the high level of anxiety associated with a diagnosis of pleural plaques and the suffering which comes from the loss of friends and colleagues to asbestos-related diseases.


The Minister said: "Having heard those testimonies, I have decided to recommend a change to the law to allow those who have been negligently exposed to asbestos and who have been diagnosed with pleural plaques, to claim compensation.


"Clearly, we cannot turn back the clock in terms of preventing exposure to asbestos, but we can ensure that the consequences of the exposure are acknowledged and addressed.
"In my view, it is only just and fair that people with pleural plaques, who are ordinary, decent, hard-working people and who may be in advanced years, should be able to call to account the people who are responsible for exposing them to asbestos.


"I hope the right to claim through the courts will provide some relief to those who, through no fault of their own, are living with this condition and that it will go some way toward reducing their distress."

http://www.londonderrysentinel.co.uk/news/Asbestos-legislation-proposal-welcomed.5441363.jp

 
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Senate OKs bill easing lawsuits on asbestos

By JAY ROOT
ASSOCIATED PRESS

April 18, 2009, 9:17PM

The bill, which passed 20-11 on a preliminary vote, would only apply to lawsuits involving mesothelioma, a rare form of cancer usually caused by the inhalation of asbestos fibers.

Lower standard of proof

The legislation, which faces more hurdles before becoming law, would set a lower standard of proof for demonstrating that asbestos exposure was significant enough to cause the cancer.

All of the Democrats in the chamber voted in favor of the legislation.

But the debate dragged on for hours as Republicans, who rule the Senate 19-12, squabbled with each other over how much the bill might negatively impact businesses and whether trial lawyers deserved big contingency fees when they win asbestos cases.

“Trial lawyers chase big pots of money,” said Sen. Dan Patrick, R-Houston. “This is a big pot of money.”

The sponsor of the legislation, Sen. Robert Duncan, R-Lubbock, said the bill would not “ruin the business climate inTexas,” and was designed to help a relatively small group of cancer victims.

He said sufferers of mesothelioma face huge delays and hassles trying to meet a relatively high standard of proof in asbestos lawsuits.

Without the legislation,Duncan said, “these people are gonna be dead by the time their case is finally resolved.”

http://www.chron.com/disp/story.mpl/headline/metro/6380608.html
 
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Breaking News:Texas Senate passes asbestos causation bill
4/16/2009 6:32 PM By Marilyn Tennissen  

Duncan (R)

AUSTIN -- A bill that critics fear will expose thousands of additional businesses to asbestos lawsuits has passed the Texas Senate.

Senate Bill 1123, authored by state Sen. Robert Duncan, R-Lubbock, relates to the standards of causation in mesothelioma claims.

The Senate approved SB 1123 on the evening of April 16 in a 20-11 vote, despite unified opposition from the business and legal reform community. The House version (HB 1811 by state Sen. Craig Eiland, D-Texas City)is pending in the House Committee on the Judiciary & Civil Jurisprudence.

The Senate bill will change established standards regarding the amount of a plaintiff's asbestos exposure and requirement that the plaintiff prove that the dose was sufficient enough to be a substantial factor in causing mesothelioma.

Support for the bills is coming from trial lawyers and labor unions, whose clients and members are usually lawsuit plaintiffs claiming asbestos exposure in the workplace.

In opposition are tort reform groups and a broad spectrum of the state's businesses and industries, which usually find themselves named as defendants in asbestos litigation.

"The personal injury lawyers' motive to expand asbestos litigation is simple: Now that reforms have clamped down on junk science asbestos lawsuits, personal injury lawyers are looking to expand the pot of money up for grabs by suing anyone, even if they're not at a fault," Chip Hough, chairman of the Bay Area Citizens Against Lawsuit Abuse, wrote in a recent column in the Southeast Texas Record.

According to a statement from Texans for Lawsuit Reform, "In effect, SB 1123 and HB 1811 reverse established law on the burden of proof, which does and should lie with the plaintiff.

"The new statute, instead, will place the burden of proof on a defendant to prove that a limited exposure to asbestos attributable to the defendant did not cause the plaintiff's mesothelioma."

Critics say SB 1123 will undo the 2007 Texas Supreme Court decision,Borg-Warner Corp. v. Flores, which required plaintiffs to not only prove exposure to the defendant's product but also prove that the dose was sufficient to be a substantial factor in causing mesothelioma.

"Since so little evidence would be necessary under SB 1123, businesses would be forced to settle regardless of liability because they can't afford the cost of a lawsuit and the threat of unlimited damages," Hough wrote.

http://www.setexasrecord.com/news/218563-breaking-news-texas-senate-passes-asbestos-causation-bill
 
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NATIONAL CANCER SURVIVORS DAY CELEBRATED AROUND THE WORLD

On June 7, Communities will Come Together to Celebrate Life after Cancer

Syracuse,NY 6/03/2009 03:15 PM GMT (FINDITT)

 

For the 22nd year in a row, survivors of cancer and their families and friends will gather together in hundreds of communities throughout the world to affirm the fact that there is indeed life after a cancer diagnosis – even following a mesothelioma cancer diagnosis, a disease which has no known cure and is considered to be one of the most fatal forms of cancer.

 

Sponsored by the non-profit National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation, the National Cancer Survivors Day celebration is the world’s largest and fastest-growing annual cancer survivor event. Initiated in theU.S. but currently observed in 16 countries worldwide, Cancer Survivors Day festivities include a wide variety of events from 5K runs, carnivals, and concerts to raise money for cancer research to workshops, inspirational programs, and other educational events for cancer survivors and their families.  Food and fun is always a part of the festivities and a feeling of triumph prevails throughout these celebrations of life.

 

Throughout the year, the National Cancer Survivors Day Foundation supports hospitals and other cancer-related organizations interested in hosting Survivors Day festivities by providing them with educational materials and networking guidance to help them organize a successful Survivors Day event, noting that their major goal is to “educate the public on the issues of cancer survivorship in order to better the quality of life for cancer survivors.”

 

A survivor is defined as anyone living with a history of cancer. An estimated 12 million cancer survivors live in theU.S. and millions more in other countries, empowered by a growing list of successful drugs and treatments designed to fight specific cancers. Even individuals with such hard-to-treat cancers as mesothelioma, an asbestos-caused disease, are now living well beyond the expected six months to two years, thanks to novel therapies like the mesothelioma treatment drug Alimta®, the first USDA-approved chemotherapy drug designed specifically for the treatment of that aggressive form of cancer. Alimta® is typically paired with Cisplatin®, another cancer-fighting drug.

 

Physicians like Dr. David Jablons, M.D., chief of thoracic surgery atUniversity ofCalifornia San Francisco, continue to dispense the latest in mesothelioma information and cutting-edge treatments for victims of this thoracic cancer, insuring that – someday – mesothelioma patients may be added to the long list of survivors celebrating National Cancer Survivors Day with their loved ones.

 

To locate the nearest National Cancer Survivors Day event, check with your local hospital or American Cancer Society office, or call the Foundation at (615) 794-3006.

 

http://www.transworldnews.com/NewsStory.aspx?id=91882&cat=10

 
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Asbestos Disease Support Group Founder Takes National Action

2009-03-04 04:21:42 (GMT) (WiredPRNews.com - Law, News)

Dr. Helen Clayson is set to be a key figure for national mesothelioma awareness day.

WiredPRNews.com – Dr. Helen Clayson, who founded a Furness support group for individuals who are dealing with diseases related to asbestos, is set to take a significant role in a national initiative for awareness about asbestos in theUK. As reported by the North-West Evening Mail, Clayson will address an international conference concerning mesothelioma in connection to Action Mesothelioma Day.

Clayson is quoted in the report as stating, “The management of distressing symptoms such as pain and breathlessness needs further research alongside investigation into treatments to prolong the lives of mesothelioma sufferers.”

The doctor serves as the medical director of the Ulverston based St. Mary’s Hospice. She is also a founding member of Barrow Asbestos-Related Disease Support Group. Clayson is further quoted as commenting, “BARDS supports unreservedly the call for theUK government to recognize its moral duty to provide funding for a National Centre for Asbestos-Related Diseases.”

Statistics suggest that mesothelioma claims the lives of six people every day.

http://www.wiredprnews.com/2009/03/04/asbestos-disease-support-group-founder-takes-national-action_200903042607.html

 
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Statement from Acting Surgeon General Steven K. Galson about National Asbestos Week

In recognition of ‘National Asbestos Awareness Week,’ I urge every American to become aware of the public health issues of asbestos exposure and the steps they can take to protect their health. 

In recent decades, because of concern about asbestos’ health effects, production and use has declined substantially. Most individuals exposed to asbestos, whether in a home, in the workplace, or out-of-doors will not develop disease- but there is no level of asbestos exposure that is known to be safe and minimizing your exposure will minimize your risk of developing asbestos-related disease.

Asbestos is the name given to a group of fibrous minerals that occur naturally in the environment.  Low levels of asbestos are commonly in the air as fibers enter the environment from natural rock outcroppings, products that contain asbestos, former asbestos mining and milling operations, and from disturbance of asbestos-containing material. It is when we are exposed to much more concentrated levels of asbestos that we should be concerned.  Therefore, it is important for all Americans to be aware of asbestos levels in their environment.

Asbestos can be dangerous if it is inhaled.  Activity that disturbs asbestos causing these small fibers to float in air increases the chances of inhalation and the contraction of asbestos-related diseases. Disturbance is what leads to exposure. Do not attempt to touch or remove asbestos by yourself. Only people professionally trained and certified to safely handle asbestos should remove it.

Once breathed in, asbestos fibers can remain in the lungs for years and even decades. Inhalation of asbestos fibers can cause inflammation and scarring of the lungs, changes in the lining of the chest cavity around the lung, and certain cancers. Remember that tobacco smoke greatly increases your risk of lung cancer if you have also been exposed to asbestos.

If you think you have been exposed to asbestos, I encourage you to speak to your health care provider. Your provider can tell you if any of your health problems might be caused by asbestos exposure.

To learn more about asbestos and asbestos related diseases, please visit:

http://www.atsdr.cdc.gov/asbestos/ 

http://www.cdc.gov/niosh/topics/asbestos/

http://www.epa.gov/asbestos/

http://www.surgeongeneral.gov/news/pressreleases/pr20090401.html

 
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The Origin of National Cancer Survivors Day

February 13, 2009 by Richard and Annette Bloch

Very close friends of ours live inJerusalem,Israel. He is an extremely important and well known man there. Their son was married to our daughter for many years. Several years ago he needed open heart surgery. His family recommended he go toBaltimore,New York,Boston orCleveland. Suddenly we heard he had the surgery inHaifa.

The next time we were with him, I asked why he pickedHaifa. Tel Aviv could be understood but no one goes toHaifa! He stated that some years before he had been watching television with no thought of ever needing heart surgery. They showed a doctor walking down the street inHaifa with all the patients on whom he had performed open heart surgery following him. There were over 500 following. He made up his mind right there that if he would ever need open heart surgery, he would go to this doctor inHaifa so he, too, could walk in the parade in future years.

I felt there had to be a connection between this experience and our work in cancer. We believe that the second largest correctable cause of cancer mortality is believing through ignorance that death and cancer are synonymous and failing to fight when diagnosed. Tobacco, of course, is the largest correctable cause of cancer mortality. If we could convince healthy people who have no interest in cancer because it only happens to other people that there is not only a possibility of life after a diagnosis of cancer, but a quality life, many would try to fight and could be saved.

We came up with the idea of the cancer survivors Rally in the Fall of 1985 and held the first Rally inKansas City the first Sunday in June, 1986 at a park in the center of downtown. The purpose was not to entertain those attending, even though that was the natural result, but for the media coverage after the event that would show the millions exposed to it that the diagnosis of cancer did not mean death.

I went to the publisher of our newspaper and explained the purpose and he immediately cooperated. Not only did he give the Rally a front page color picture in Monday morning’s paper, but he called the head of the ABC-TV affiliate inKansas City and suggested he call Good Morning America and get them out to cover it. They did and that was the birth of National Cancer Survivors Day. Having seen it on Good Morning America, numerous cities had the Rally the next year. ThenCoping magazine joined with the national office of the American Cancer Society (ACS) to co-sponsored the event nationally. Later, the national office of the National Coalition for Cancer Survivorship (NCCS) took over co-sponsorship from ACS.  In 1994, the non-profitNational Cancer Survivors Day Foundation was formed to equally and fairly assist all cancer-related organizations wishing to hold a National Cancer Survivors Day (NCSD) celebration and to obtain national publicity for the event.  Today, NCSD is the world’s largest cancer survivor event and is sponsored nationally byCoping magazine and philanthropic companies interested in bettering the quality of life for cancer survivors.  Although the national offices of ACS and NCCS are no longer national sponsors, their local chapters remain highly active in hosting NCSD events.  Anyone interested in starting an NCSD event in his or her community may call the NCSD Foundation at (615) 794-3006 and request a free NCSD Celebration Planning Kit.

The Rally is an annual reality the first Sunday in June in hundreds of cities across theUnited States. A few cities celebrate it at some other time for a specific reason. InPalm Springs,California, the Rally is held in April because it is so hot in the desert in June and so many people have left town. Whenever it is held, its message is the same. In cities with a Richard &AnnetteBlochCancerSurvivorsPark, that is the site of the Rally. Hopefully, in the not too distant future, there will be a Richard &AnnetteBlochCancerSurvivorsPark in every major city in theUS andCanada, but that is another story for another time.

Everyone working on the Rally knows they are helping people who they will never know. They are giving unknown individuals the will to fight for their life. They are improving the quality of life for many. Whether you are a cancer patient or the supporter of a cancer patient, when you attend the Rally, not only will you enjoy yourself, but you will inspire others not yet diagnosed with cancer to fight the disease when they are diagnosed. You are truly performing a blessing.

Thus from open heart surgery inIsrael to National Cancer Survivors Day is just one small step.

http://blochcancer.org/2009/02/the-origin-of-national-cancer-survivors-day/

 
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GOP seeks bill clarifying asbestos claims in state
-Article published December 12, 2008


CLEVELAND - Republican lawmakers inOhio said yesterday they are working to obtain House approval next week of a bill requiring more clarity in certain asbestos-exposure claims.

The measure would then go to Democratic Gov. Ted Strickland, who has indicated be might veto it because of concerns about preserving the rights of ill people to pursue compensation claims.

 

Two Ohio Supreme Court rulings have raised the difficulty of filing asbestos-related lawsuits.

The proposal would require plaintiffs in asbestos cases to disclose details about claims made to asbestos trusts, which pay the liability of firms forced into bankruptcy while subjected to asbestos litigation.

 

Those making claims often suffer from asbestosis, a lung disorder that occurs after asbestos exposure. Asbestos has been used in manufacturing and construction and has microscopic bundles of fibers that may be inhaled.

The bill has split the legislature along party lines in its lame-duck session likely to end next week. Democrats take over the House from the Republicans in January. Republicans will keep control of the Senate, which has approved a companion to the House bill.

Sponsors of the bills in the House and Senate, Rep. Lou Blessing and Sen. Bill Seitz, both Cincinnati-area Republicans, say the bill would not inhibit filing claims but would guard against double-dipping.

Without the measure, claimants can allege different or even conflicting facts within the bankruptcy trust system and the civil litigation system, Mr. Seitz said.

The National Federation of Independent Businesses, the Ohio Chamber of Commerce, and the Ohio Manufacturers Association, and law firms representing firms facing lawsuits back the legislation, Senator Seitz said.

 

Mr. Strickland said it's premature for him to say how he will respond until he sees the final bill. "I will look at it very, very carefully and will try to make the best judgment regarding my response, if in fact it does pass," he told The Associated Press inCleveland this week. "I will likely oppose an effort to limit an individual's right to seek justice and redress under the law."

 

Mr. Blessing said he hopes to meet soon with Mr. Strickland to discuss the bill. "What the bill says is you have to be consistent in what you are claiming," he said. "This disease does not appear sometimes for 30 or 40 years after exposure. There are going to be victims in future years who will want to access these trust funds."

Ohio at one time had the nation's largest backlog of asbestos-related cases. A 2004 state law requires a plaintiff to show that a medical expert who treated the plaintiff has found that the patient's health has been substantially impaired by asbestos exposure.

Two recent Ohio Supreme Court rulings made filing an asbestos-related lawsuit tougher by limiting the timeframe. One ruling restricted the ability to pursue asbestos claims filed before a 2004 law took effect that set a higher bar of proof.CuyahogaCounty judges tossed about 30,000 pending asbestos injury claims.

 

http://toledoblade.com/apps/pbcs.dll/article?AID=/20081212/NEWS24/812120389

 
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Snowdrops will act as a memorial

22 October 2008 By Terry Kelly - Industry reporter

 

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In memory ... snowdrops.

In memory ... snowdrops.


SNOWDROPS will be planted inSouth Tyneside to commemorate all those who have died from an industrial disease.


A total of 10,000 snowdrops, to be planted on both sides of theTyne, will be a lasting reminder of all those who have succumbed to the asbestos-linked cancer mesothelioma.

The first snowdrops will be planted tomorrow inSaltwellPark, Gateshead, followed by theSirGBMemorialHunterHospital, Wallsend, on October 31.

A third planting ceremony will be held at the Lawe Top roundabout, inLawe Road, South Shields, on Monday, November 3, at 11am.

The memorial event has been organised by South Tyneside, Gateshead andNorth Tyneside councils, in partnership with The Snowdrop Fund, created by the Mick Knighton Mesothelioma Research Fund (MKMRF).

The Mayor of South Tyneside, Coun Alex Donaldson, said: "Mesothelioma is a devastating illness that has touched the lives of many people inSouth Tyneside.

"It is so important that we remember those who have lost their lives to this disease, and support efforts to fund the vital research going on with the aim of finding a cure.

"Planting the snowdrops at the Lawe Top is an effective way of contributing towards these aims, and will help to keep this issue in the public eye.

"The Lawe Top is a prominent location, overlooking our beautiful coastline, and the snowdrops will be a welcome addition there."

Mesothelioma is an incurable cancer, which can lie dormant in the lungs for up to 40 years.

The Snowdrop Fund was launched in February to allow families across theUK to establish a tribute charity as a lasting legacy for vital research into mesothelioma.

Money from the fund will be injected into the MKMRF, which has already raised more than £400,000 for research into the disease.

Chris Knighton, founder of the MKMRF, said: "By planting these snowdrops on both sides of theTyne, we hope to commemorate all those who died from mesothelioma.

"When the bulbs spring in January, they will remind people of the legacy of asbestos, but will also give hope that one day we will find a cure for this terrible disease."


http://www.shieldsgazette.com/news/Snowdrops-will-act-as-a.4615646.jp

 
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MARCO POLO: THECHINA MYSTERY REVEALED Did Marco Polo Really Discover Asbestos?

 
 
 
 
 
1965 Armstong asbestos tile commercial
1:16

1965 Armstongasbestos tile commercial

n 1860, Thomas M. Armstrong, the son of Scotish-Irish immigrants from Londonderry, joined with John D. Glass to open a one-room shop in Pittsburgh...

 
 
Asbestos in electrical work 1959
0:58

Asbestos in electrical work 1959

This was clipped from the 1959 film, Asbestos a matter of time, by the US Bureau of Mines, Department of the Interior. For more information about...

 
Asbestos The Silent Killer Part 1 of 3
8:45

Asbestos The Silent Killer Part 1 of 3

Produced by United Steelworkers Local 480 at the Teck Cominco Smelter in Trail, BC, this hard-hitting documentary examines the devastating human...

 
 
Asbestos Tragedy Libby Montana 2004 USEPA
2:36

Asbestos Tragedy Libby Montana 2004 USEPA

Processed vermiculite from the WR Grace Libby MT Mine contained tremolite, a form of asbestos, that was allowed to contaminate local

 
 
Summerlin Rd, Asbestos found, Fox News.wmv
2:10

Summerlin Rd,Asbestos found, FoxNews.wmv

Summerlin Rdasbestos found. Reported by FoxNews..

 
 
 
 
 
 
Video: Old Promotional Film For AsbestosAdded to
Quicklist
3:45

Video: Old Promotional Film ForAsbestos

www.searchmesothelioma.net Both the government and corporate industry used promotional newsreel type films during the 1950s and 1960s to promote...

 
Introduction to Asbestos from 1959Added to
Quicklist
2:30

Introduction toAsbestos from 1959

This clip is from the 1959 film, "Asbestos: a Matter of Time," by the Bureau of Mines (US Department of the Interior.) The entire film is..

 
 
 
 


4:38

About theAsbestos DiseaseAwareness Organization (ADAO)
Asbestos DiseaseAwareness Organization, ADAO, Linda Reinstein, BanAsbestos, www.adao.us

 

8:31
mesothelioma
Mesothelioma is an incurableasbestos cancer. This short film was produced to raiseawareness of the issues around mesothelioma. It...

 

 
 
 
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