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Asbestos Mesothelioma: Asbestos Workers


 

We connect you with experienced Asbestos Workers Mesothelioma Asbestos lawyers. If have been diagnosed with Mesothelioma or an Asbestos related illness we can help you file a claim.

Asbestos Workers diagnosed with Mesothelioma and other Asbestos related diseases have legal options and may seek compensation through Mesothelioma litigation.

Filing a claim against the companies that are responsible for your asbestos exposure will help you gain compensation for medical costs and pain and suffering associated with asbestos-related illnesses. A Mesothelioma lawyer can help you pursue compensation for the following things:

  • Lost income
  • Medical bills
  • Group support for yourself and loved ones
  • End-of-life expenses

We help patients and their families make educated, informed decisions about how to proceed with filing Mesothelioma, Asbestosis and other asbestos-related cancer claims.

We will walk you through the entire process of connecting with an experienced Asbestos Worker’s Mesothelioma Lawyer and also help you find a qualified Mesothelioma doctor.

 
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Asbestos Workers – Asbestos Exposure – Asbestos Health Disorders

 


Asbestos

Natural asbestos is found in two varieties: serpentine asbestos and amphibole asbestos. Approximately 90% of serpentine is the variety chrysotile, while amphibole asbestos includes crocidolite, amosite, anthophyllite asbestos, actinole asbestos, and tremolite asbestos.

Asbestos has been observed to cause four health disorders. Asbestosis results in stiffening of the lung, and has resulted in the deaths of many miners. Lung cancer has a higher incidence in miners who also smoke, with the chance of developing cancer roughly proportional to the amount smoked. Asbestos-induced cancer is found only rarely in nonsmokers. Among the various type of asbestos, chrysotile workers have the lowest incidence of cancer. Mesothelioma involves the development of a fatal tumor. The time between diagnosis and original exposure is commonly 30 years or more. Family members of miners are also at risk. Among the general population, 70-80% of all mesothelioma cases are caused by exposure to asbestos. A staggering 18% of all mortalities in crocidolite workers are the result ofmesotheliomaBenign pleural changes also occur to an extent proportional to exposure, but rarely cause functional impairment.

Judging from this data, there appears to be a difference in the detrimental effects of asbestos depending on the variety. In fact, "chrysotile-exposed workers have shown an appreciable lung burden of amphibole fibers.In contrast, chrysotile has been found post-mortem in smaller amounts than expected in the lungs ofasbestos workers" (Mossman 1990, p. 296).

"Data suggest that amphiboles are the major cause of mesotheliomas inasbestos workers." On the basis of medical studies, "amphiboles are more potent than chrysotile in the induction of fibrotic lung disease and associated lung cancer." The reason for the difference in virulence is that "rod-like amphiboles appear to penetrate the peripheral lung more readily than chrysotile fibers, which are curly" (Mossman 1990, pp. 294-295). Furthermore, according to theStanton hypothesis, "fibers longer than 8 m and less than 0.25 m in diameter have the most marked carcinogenic potential." This is presumably a result of the differing shapes, which means that "chrysotile fibers, in comparison to amphibole fibers, are cleared more readily from human lungs."

"The available experimental and epidemiological data indicate that both fiber types are important determinants of the pathogenicity of asbestos." "Recent epidemiological data are concordant with the suggestion that exposure to chrysotile at current occupational standards does not increase the risk of asbestos-associated diseases." However, "federal policy in theUnited States does not differentiate between different types of asbestos." This makes little sense, since, "with few exceptions, the type of asbestos fiber found predominantly in buildings is chrysotile."(Mossman, p. 247). Furthermore, removal will cost $53 billion, but estimates range up to $100-150 billion (Mossman 1990, p. 94).

"Recent epidemiological studies of deaths from mesothelioma in the general population also suggest that risk from asbestos in buildings is minuscule." "Risks of asbestos-related total deaths (both lung cancers and mesothelioma) due to exposure in schools are magnitudes lower than commonplace risks in modern day society," for example, 0.005-0.096 deaths/million compared to 6 deaths/million for airplane accidents. "The available data and comparative risk assessments indicate that chrysotile asbestos, the type of fiber found predominantly inU. S. schools and buildings, is not a health risk in the nonoccupational environment.Clearly, the asbestos panic in theU. S. must be curtailed" (Mossman 1990, p. 299).

"About 95% of the commercial asbestos now used in theUnited States is chrysotile." Chrysotile asbestos used in theU. S. is mined mainly from vast deposits inQuebec. Amosite in mined only in South Africa, crocidolite only in South Africa, western Australia, and Bolivia, and anthophyllite only in Finland.Russia is the world's largest chrysotile producer, followed byCanada andSouth Africa (Ross 1981, p. 281).

Ross comes to similar conclusions about the health risks associated with cancer. "Pleural cancer seems to be caused by crocidolite asbestos but not by chrysotile or anthophyllite asbestos. Lung cancer is caused by chrysotile, anthophyllite, amosite, and crocidolite asbestos inasbestos workers who smoke cigarettes. Evidence for excess lung cancer in nonsmokingasbestos workers is weak.Two completely different substances, asbestos and cigarette smoke, combine to produce a very significant risk to manyasbestos workers, particularly those who are heavily exposed to asbestos dusts."

"Generally, asbestos related diseases appear inasbestos workers only after many years have elapsed since first exposure. A significant increase in the lung cancer death rate appears 10 to 14 years after first exposure and peaks at 30 to 35 years. The mesothelioma death rate becomes significant 20 years after the first exposure, but continues to climb even after 45 years have elapsed.The asbestosis death rate becomes significant 15 to 20 years after first exposure and apparently peaks at 40 to 45 years" (Ross 1981, p. 303).

"Increased risk of lung cancer due to asbestos exposure in non-smokers is very low. There appears to be no relationship between smoking habits and the incidence of mesothelioma" (Ross 1981, p. 306). "Analysis shows a positive correlation between lung cancer and mesothelioma mortality.Individuals who did not come into contact with crocidolite have very low mesothelioma mortality" (Ross 1981, p. 311). "There is no question that those exposed to heavy concentrations of chrysotile and anthophyllite dust over long periods of time have suffered a significant excess mortality due to lung cancer and asbestosis--but not to mesothelioma. For men exposed for over 20 years [to] low and medium dust [concentrations], there was a slight excess of risk for lung cancer" (Ross 1981, p. 313).

"Crocidolite asbestos is much more hazardous than chrysotile, anthophyllite, and amosite.Mesothelioma deaths have been reported among the residents of these areas who are not employed in the mines or mills" (Ross 1981, p. 314). However, "mesothelioma is very rare where amosite is mined" (Ross 1981, p. 315).

"Of the six forms of asbestos, only four have been used to any significant degree in commerce.These are amosite, crocidolite, anthophyllite, and chrysotile" (Ross 1981, p. 316). "Lung cancer can be caused by exposure to chrysotile, anthophyllite, amosite, and crocidolite asbestos; however, increased risk of this disease is probably found only in those who smoke cigarettes. Asbestosis is also caused by heavy and prolonged exposure to all four forms of asbestos. Mesothelioma is caused principally by exposure to crocidolite asbestos. There is good evidence that anthophyllite and chrysotile asbestos do not cause any significant increase in mesothelioma mortality, even after heavy exposure for many years" (Ross 1981, p. 317).

In conclusion, "chrysotile miners working a lifetime under present dust levels should not be expected to suffer any measurable excess cancer" (Ross 1981, p. 318).

References

Mossman, B. T. et al. . "Asbestos: Scientific Development and Implications for Public Policy." Science 247, 294-301, 1990.

Ross, M. "The Geologic Occurrences and Health Hazards of Amphibole and Serpentine Asbestos." In Reviews in Mineralogy, Volume 9A: Amphiboles and Other Hydrous Pyriboles--Mineralogy (Ed. D. R. Veblen).Washington,DC: Mineralogical Society ofAmerica, pp. 279-323, 1981.

© 1996-2007 Eric W. Weisstein

 

 

http://scienceworld.wolfram.com/chemistry/Asbestos.html

 
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Asbestos Workers – Asbestos Exposure –Nonoccupational Asbestos

The New Menace of Mesothelioma Resulting fromNonoccupational Asbestos Exposure

Posted: May 17, 2010


The development ofasbestos related disease in workers has been closely studied for some time.  However,a new wave of mesothelioma cases are emerging from the spouses of workers that were exposed to this hazardous material.  One important study is called, "Asbestos-Related Disease from Household Exposure" by Gary R.Epler,Muiris X. Fitz Gerald, Edward A.Gaensler, Charles B. Carrington - Respiration 1980;39:229-240.  Here is an excerpt: "Abstract - The importance ofnonoccupational asbestos exposure has been emphasized recently. To illustrate this problem, we report 4 persons with asbestos-related disease from household exposure. There were 2 wives ofasbestos workers, who cleaned their husbands' work clothes. One developed amesothelioma and the other plaques, calcification, benign asbestos pleural effusion andsubpleuralparenchymal fibrosis. 2 men were exposed as children while playing in a cellar room which was also used for their father's muffler repair business. At ages 27 and 33, they had pleural and diaphragmatic calcifications." 

 

Another study worth examining is called, "Asbestos induces apoptosis in human alveolar macrophages" by R. F. Hamilton, L. L.Iyer and A.Holian - Department of Internal Medicine, University of Texas Medical School,Houston77030,USA.  Am JPhysiol Lung Cell MolPhysiol 271: L813-L819,1996.  Here is an excerpt: "Asbestos refers to a group of fibrous minerals implicated in the development of several lung diseases, including fibrosis (asbestosis), cancer, and malignantmesothelioma. Although major health risks exist in occupationally exposed individuals, low-level exposures of asbestos may still contribute to health problems. The mechanism by which asbestos causes lung disease is not clearly understood but has been proposed to involve the alveolar macrophage (AM). We propose that asbestos inducesapoptosis of AM, resulting in the development of an inflammatory state.

 

In this study, we examined two forms of asbestos,chrysotile (CHR) andcrocidolite (CRO), along with a control fiber,wollastonite (WOL), to characterize their relativecytotoxicity and ability to stimulate apoptosis in vitro. AM were cultured for 24 h with these particulates and examined for cell viability (trypan blue exclusion) and apoptosis (morphology, levels ofcytosolicoligonucleosomal DNA fragments, and DNA ladder). In the absence of a decrease in cell viability, both CHR and CRO produced changes in cell morphology consistent with apoptosis. In addition, levels ofcytoplasmicoligonucleosomal DNA (Cell Death Detection enzyme-linkedimmunosorbent assay) were significantly enhanced for CHR (3-25 micrograms/ml) and CRO (25-75 micrograms/ml) in a dose-dependent manner (a process that wasinhibitable by 10microM Z-Val-Ala-Aspfluoromethylketone, an interleukin-converting enzyme inhibitor). In contrast, WOL (up to 400 micrograms/ml) produced no significant DNA fragmentation in a 24-h culture. Neither CHR nor CRO caused DNA ladder formation in 24-h cell cultures. However, in 48-h cell cultures, both CHR- and CRO-exposed cells, but not WOL, resulted in the formation of DNA ladders characteristic of apoptosis. In summary, these results suggest that, unlikenonfibrogenic particulates, low doses of asbestos fibers cause apoptosis in cultured human AM that may be an early step in the development of lung fibrosis."

 

A third study is called, "Iron mobilization fromcrocidolite asbestos greatly enhancescrocidolite-dependent formation of DNA single-strand breaks in øX174 RFI DNA" by Loren G. Lund and Ann E.Aust - Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, Utah State University Logan, UT 84322–0300, USA.  Here is an excerpt: "The ability of the iron associated with asbestos to catalyze damage to øX174 RFI DNA was determined and compared with iron mobilized from asbestos. Asbestos (1 mg/ml) suspended for 30 min in 50mMNaCl containing 0.5 µg øX174 RFI DNA, pH 7.5, did not catalyze detectable amounts of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB). However, additionofoascorbate (1mM) resulted in 19, 26, 7 or 8% DNA with SSB forcrocidolite,amosite,chrysotile ortremolite respectively. The percentage of DNA with SSB induced by each form of asbestos was directly related to its iron content. Inclusion ofdesferrioxamine B, which bindsFe(III) rendering itredox inactive, completely inhibited asbestos-dependent formation of DNA SSB, suggesting that iron was responsible for catalyzing the formation of DNA SSB. Mobilization ofFe(II) fromcrocidolite by citrate, EDTA ornitrikrtriacetate (1mM) in the absence ofascorbate resulted in 15, 33 or 63% DNA with SSB respectively.

 

This activity was completely inhibited by compounds considered to be OH scavengers, i.e.mannitol, 5, 5-dimethyl-l-pyroline N-oxide orsalicylate (100mM).Preincubation ofcrocidolite with citrate (1mM) for 24 h resulted in mobilization of 52 µMiron and increasedascorbate-dependent induction of DNA SSB compared withcrocidolite that waspreincubated without citrate. Iron mobilized by citrate was entirely responsible forcrocidolite-dependent formation of DNA SSB as evidenced by complete inhibition withdesferrioxamine B. Therefore, the results of the present study strongly suggest that iron was responsible for asbestos-dependent generation of oxygen radicals, which resulted in the formation of DNA SSB. Mobilization of iron bychelators, followed byredox cycling, greatly enhancedcrocidolite-dependent formation of DNA SSB. Thus, mobilization of iron in vivo by low mol. wtchelators may lead to the increased production of reactive oxygen species resulting in damage tobiomolecules, such as DNA."

If you found any of these excerpts, please read them in their entirety.  We all owe a debt of gratitude to these researchers.

(ArticlesBaseSC #2389604)

Read more: http://www.articlesbase.com/cancer-articles/the-new-menace-of-mesothelioma-resulting-from-nonoccupational-asbestos-exposure-2389604.html#ixzz0q0IlgwKL 
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Asbestos Worker – Asbestos Trades –Mesothelioma Lawsuit

MESOTHELIOMA COURT CASE ROUNDUP

August 2009

Juries around the country have recently awarded more than$31.6 million in a half-dozen lawsuits triggered by disease relating to plaintiffs’ alleged exposure to asbestos.Asbestos fibers are linked to various diseases, includingmesothelioma, a deadly cancer of thelining of the lung and stomach. The mesothelioma case results are as follows:

·  $12.1 million to a retiredNavy machinist againstLone Star Industries andJohn Crane, Inc.

·  $8.4 million to a formerdrywaller againstHamilton Materials, Inc.

·  $4.5 million to the family of a deceasedconstruction worker againstBondex International, Inc. and Conwed Corp.

·  $3.4 million to the family of a deceasedasbestos transite plant worker againstAdvocate Mines Limited.

·  $2.5 million to the family of a deceased spouse of anasbestos worker againstUnion Asbestos & Rubber Co.; UNARCO Industries, Inc.; Pneumo Abex, LLC; Honeywell International, Inc.; Johns-Manville; Raybestos-Manhattan; Owens-Illinois; Owens Corning; and Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.

·  $700,000 to the family of a deceasedmechanic’s assistant againstGarlock Sealing Technologies.

 

http://www.pattonboggs.com/newsletters/insights/Release/insights_2009_08.htm
 
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Asbestos Workers – Asbestos Medical –Asbestos History

 

A Brief History of Asbestos

Posted: Aug 03, 2008

 

Asbestos is a naturally-occurring fibrous mineral ofmetamorpic hydrous magnesium silicate. The term "metamorphic" is used to describe a process of extreme heat and pressure which creates specific secondary patterns of minerals with new chemical and/or physical properties. 

As the primary rock is heated andrecooled, silicate crystals align in long rows of mineral fibers, which easily separate into tiny shards thinner than a human hair. Asbestos fibers are not a health risk as long as they are undisturbed. However, when asbestos is undergoes natural weathering, or is mined and processed, the microscopic particles waft into the air and cause disease if they are inhaled. 

Asbestosis occurs when an inhaled asbestos particle irritates the body's naturaldefence mechanisms, causing inflammation and scarring which eventually restricts lung function.Mesothelioma is a malignant tumor of the membranes surrounding theheart, lungs and abdominal cavity. Asbestos can also cause cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, larynx, stomach, lung and lymphoid tissue.

Asbestos exposure can also cause non-fatal illnesses such as asbestos warts, caused when asbestos fibers are lodged in the skin, causing lumps of scar tissue to form around the irritant in the same manner as they do in the lungs to cause asbestosis; pleural plaques, discrete, sometimes calcified fibrous lesions which can be seen on X-rays but are too small to cause breathing impairment; and diffuse pleural thickening, which can cause breathing impairment if it is extensive.

Due to its fire resistant properties, asbestos has been used historically for household and industrial purposes. It has been found woven into burial cloths in ancientEgypt, and Charlemagne reportedly had a tablecloth made of asbestos which he would throw into a fire to clean. 

In World War II asbestos was considered so important by the War Department that it was considered a strategic material, and many American workers were exposed in the World War II boom in shipbuilding. After the war, it was widely used in the construction industry.

In modern Western society, it was used for such diverse purposes as lamp wicks, brake shoes, oven insulation, electrical hotplate wiring and home insulation, roofing and flooring. For instance, some kinds of vermiculite used in home insulation into the 1970s contained asbestos. The EPA banned this product in 1977. 

When a home owner discovers asbestos in an old home, it should not be a cause for immediate panic. If the asbestos looks intact and is notpulverised, it is best to leave it alone. However, because of legal liability, schools and businesses containing asbestos usually must undergo a costly removal process, hazardous in itself because disturbing the stable asbestos product causes fibers to fill the air. Special equipment must be used to insure that the removal process does not cause health problems where non existed before.

Mostindustrialised nations have reduced or banned the use of asbestos for at least 30 years and now use fiberglass or woven ceramic fiber as a substitute, but since asbestos-caused disease has a latency period of up to 50 years, patients are still presenting with these illness today. Every year inAmerica, approximately 3000 new cases ofmesothelioma are diagnosed, and 550 deaths occurs due to asbestosis. According to the March 1991 Report of the Judicial Conference Ad Hoc Committee on Asbestos Litigation, asbestos exposure has caused the deaths of approximately 200,000 to 265,000 Americans.

Asbestos use peaked in theUnited States in 1973, when 1 million tons of the material were used. The EPA attempted to institute a complete legal ban on the use of asbestos products in 1989; however, this ban was largely eviscerated by the US 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in 1991, and some restricted use of asbestos, albeit in fewer products than before, resumed. Therefore, even today some workers are being exposed to this toxic material. 

Asbestos is a serious continuing concern to the Environmental Protection Agency, and their website has detailed information on asbestos and its removal.

Concerns about the health risks of asbestos exposure date back to 1898, when the Chief Inspector of Factories of theUnited Kingdom reported to Parliament in his Annual Report about the "evil effects of asbestos dust". He noted that the "sharp, glass like nature of the particles" when allowed to remain suspended in the air, "have been found to be injurious, as might have been expected". In 1906 a British Parliamentary Commission confirmed the first cases of asbestos-related deaths in British factories and called for improved ventilation and other safety measures. In 1918 an American insurance company produced a study showing premature deaths in the asbestos industry in theUnited States and in 1926 the Massachusetts Industrial Accidents Board processed the first successful claim by a sickasbestos worker.

Today, lawsuits claiming compensation for asbestos-related illnesses are a growth industry in the legal profession. An internet search of "mesothelioma lawyer" yields 1,910,000 results. The original manufacturers of asbestos products have long since been driven into Chapter 11 bankruptcy; plaintiffs have now turned to suing corporations with peripheral connections to asbestos products. More than 70 American corporations have filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy in due to asbestos liability claims.

Since the 1970's, approximately 6% of all lawsuits filed in American courts have been asbestos-related. The lawsuits now facing the courts have been described as "an elephantine mass" by the US Supreme Court, and are expected to cost between 200 to 275 billion dollars to settle. Asbestos liability is one of the largest issues facing the global insurance industry today. 

Most epidemiological studies expected the number of lawsuits to peak in the 1990s, but this has not occurred, either because of the long latency period of asbestos-related diseases, or because legal action is becoming more popular among asbestos-exposed members of the public due to high-profile legal cases and widespread advertising by attorneys who specialize in such cases.

Many complaints have been made by representatives of industries facing lawsuits and the insurance companies who will be expected to pay them that the asbestos-lawsuit industry is rife with fraud, with less that half of all payouts reaching the plaintiffs. Aggressive, ambulance-chasing lawyers are said to exaggerate medical disability and coach clients on their testimony. 

The group of plaintiffs includes not only ill people, but also those who have merely have a history of asbestos exposure and want compensation for potential future health risks. According to theAmericanAcademy ofActuraries Mass Tort Work Group, more than 100 million Americans have been exposed to asbestos in their workplace during the past century.

(ArticlesBaseSC #507855)

Christian Ward - About the Author:

Christian is an author of several articles pertaining to No Win No Fee, Compensation Claims, Work Accident Claims, Personal Injury Claims and other legal articles.


Read more: http://www.articlesbase.com/personal-injury-articles/a-brief-history-of-asbestos-507855.html#ixzz0pGoSBlC1 
Under Creative Commons License: Attribution

 

http://www.articlesbase.com/personal-injury-articles/a-brief-history-of-asbestos-507855.htm
 
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Asbestos Worker –Asbestos Company - Mesothelioma Jury Award

 

MESOTHELIOMA COURT CASE ROUNDUP

August 2009

Juries around the country have recently awarded more than$31.6 million in a half-dozen lawsuits triggered by disease relating to plaintiffs’ alleged exposure toasbestos. Asbestos fibers are linked to various diseases, includingmesothelioma, a deadly cancer of the lining of the lung and stomach. Themesothelioma case results are as follows:

·  $12.1 million to a retired Navy machinist against Lone Star Industries and John Crane, Inc.

·  $8.4 million to a formerdrywaller against Hamilton Materials, Inc.

·  $4.5 million to the family of a deceased construction worker againstBondex International, Inc. andConwed Corp.

·  $3.4 million to the family of a deceased asbestostransite plant worker against Advocate Mines Limited.

·  $2.5 million to the family of a deceased spouse of anasbestos worker against Union Asbestos & Rubber Co.; UNARCO Industries, Inc.;PneumoAbex, LLC; Honeywell International, Inc.; Johns-Manville;Raybestos-Manhattan; Owens-Illinois; Owens Corning; and Metropolitan Life Insurance Co.

·  $700,000 to the family of a deceased mechanic’s assistant againstGarlock Sealing Technologies.

 

http://www.pattonboggs.com/newsletters/insights/Release/insights_2009_08.htm

 
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Asbestos Workers – Asbestos Trades - Mesothelioma Death Lawsuit

16 new asbestos cases filed in Madison County Sept. 21-25
10/9/2009 2:23 PM ByKelly Holleran 

A total of 16 new asbestos lawsuits were filed in Madison County Circuit Court during the week of Sept. 21 through Sept. 25.

The following complaints were filed:

--Mary Bertrand of Ontario alleges the recently deceased Robert Bertrand developed mesothelioma after his work as a laborer and insulator at various locations throughout Illinois and Canada from 1969 until 2008. Mary Bertrand will be represented by Richard L. Saville Jr., Ethan A. Flint and David J. Page of Saville and Flint in Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1003.

--Robert and Isabelle Bullock of Ohio claim Robert Bullock developed mesothelioma after his work as a teacher, minister, bus driver, toll booth operator and self-employed operator of various camps and resorts throughout Illinois, Missouri, Pennsylvania and New York from 1950 until 2005. The Bullocks will be represented by Timothy F. Thompson Jr. and Ryan J. Kiwala of Simmons, Browder, Gianaris, Angelides and Barnerd in East Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1004.

--Walter Cain, a member of the U.S. Navy from 1967 until 1971 and from 1975 and 1977 and a worker at various other jobs until 2007, claims mesothelioma. Cain will be represented by Richard L. Saville Jr. and Ethan A. Flint of Saville and Flint in Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1017.

--Bruce Klabunde of North Dakota claims his recently deceased mother, Elizabeth Klabunde, developed mesothelioma after her work as a receptionist and home remodeler at various locations from 1970 until 1979. Bruce Klabunde will be represented by Robert Phillips, Perry J. Browder and Rosalind M. Robertson of Simmons, Browder, Gianaris, Angelides and Barnerd in East Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1011.

--Gerald and Kathleen LaBathe of Texas claim Gerald LaBathe developed mesothelioma after his work as a member of the U.S. Army in 1951 and in the National Guard from 1954 until 1974. Gerald LaBathe was also a member of theAsbestos Workers' Local 34 and worked in numerous refineries and chemical plants, according to the complaint. The LaBathes will be represented by Randy L. Gori and Barry Julian of Gori, Julian and Associates in Edwardsville. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1018.

--Dolores Molloy of Illinois claims her recently deceased husband, Joseph Molloy, developed mesothelioma after his work as an electrician and mechanic at various locations from 1948 until 1985. Dolores Molloy will be represented by Nate Mudd of French and Mudd in St. Louis. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1025.

--Fabian Moyano claims his recently deceased father, Guillermo Moyano, developed mesothelioma after his work as a superintendent from 1970 until 1979. Fabian Moyano will be represented by Robert Phillips, Perry J. Browder and Rosalind M. Robertson of Simmons, Browder, Gianaris, Angelides and Barnerd in East Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1010.

--Dexter Napier of Georgia, a laborer at various locations from 1961 until 1979, claims lung cancer. Napier will be represented by Robert Phillips, Perry J. Browder and Rosalind M. Robertson of Simmons, Browder, Gianaris, Angelides and Barnerd in East Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1012.

--Donald Pattison claims recently deceased Arthella Pattison developed mesothelioma after her work at St. Johns and Orvid-Elsie schools. She was also exposed to asbestos fibers through her husband, Reo Ivan Pattison, who worked as a press operator. Donald Pattison will be represented by Richard L. Saville Jr., Ethan A. Flint and Andrew J. Balcer of Saville and Flint in Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1026.

--Adriana M. Perez of Florida, a laborer at ABC Print Shop in Miami from 1964 until 1979, a laborer at Haiti from 1964 until 1968, an office worker at Nikki Lu in the 1980s and a secretary at a doctor's office in 1985, claims mesothelioma. Perez claims she was also exposed to asbestos fibers through her husband, who worked as a maintenance worker at a foundry, according to the complaint. Perez will be represented by Randy L. Gori and Barry Julian of Gori, Julian and Associates in Edwardsville. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1002.

--Richard W. and Geraldine F. Reeves of Indiana claim Richard W. Reeves developed mesothelioma after his work as a seaman in the U.S. Navy from 1955 until 1958, as a bill collector for various credit and accounting firms from 1958 until 1970 and as a boilermaker for various employees through the international Boilermaker Union from 1970 until 1995. Richard W. Reeves was also exposed to asbestos fibers through his father, who was a millwright for various employers from 1947 until 1955, according to the complaint. Randy L. Gori of Gori, Julian and Associates in Edwardsville will be representing the Reeves. W. Mark Lanier, Patrick N. Haines, Angela B. Greenberg, Sam T. Richard, Bridget B. Truxillo and Lauren H. Ware of The Lanier Law Firm in Houston will serve of counsel. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1005.

--Ella D. Ridout of Texas claims her recently deceased husband, Thomas G. Ridout, developed lung cancer after his work as a member of the U.S. Air Force from 1971 until 1973, as an iron worker, welder and crane operator for various construction companies from 1974 until 1994, as a general foreman for Martin K. Eby from 1994 until 1995, as a general foreman for H.B. Zachry from 1995 until 2001, as a superintendent for Wanzek Construction from 2005 until 2006 and as a general foreman and general superintendent for Fluor. Elizabeth V. Heller and Robert Rowland of Goldenberg, Heller, Antognoli and Rowland in Edwardsville will be representing her. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1006.

--Anne M. Schmuhl of Ohio claims her recently deceased father, Julius M. Storti, developed mesothelioma after his work with Transformer Engineering Corp. from 1943 until 2006. Schmuhl will be represented by Elizabeth V. Heller and Robert Rowland of Goldenberg, Heller, Antognoli and Rowland in Edwardsville. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1014.

--Danielle Taurmina of New York claims her recently deceased stepfather, Mario Bosio, developed mesothelioma after his work as a civil engineer and a home remodeler at various locations from 1978 until 1979. Taurmina will be represented by Robert Phillips, Perry J. Browder and Rosalind M. Robertson of Simmons, Browder, Gianaris, Angelides and Barnerd in East Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1013.

--Maurice Wintermann of Illinois, a boilermaker, janitor and laborer at various locations from 1950 until 1990, claims mesothelioma. Wintermann will be represented by Andrew O'Brien, Christopher Thoron, Christina J. Neilson, Bartholomew J. Baumstark and Gerald J. FitzGerald of the O'Brien Law Firm in St. Louis. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1009.

--John J. Worthen of Illinois, a bricklayer for Worthen Brick Construction Company from 1971 until 1976, a bricklayer for Coppers in 1974, a bricklayer for Ser-Steel from 1976 until 1977 and a bricklayer for National Steel and US Steel from 1977 until now, claims lung cancer. Worthen will be represented by Elizabeth V. Heller and Robert Rowland of Goldenberg, Heller, Antognoli and Rowland in Edwardsville. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1015

http://www.stclairrecord.com/news/221577-16-new-asbestos-cases-filed-in-madison-county-sept.-21-25

 
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Asbestos Workers – Asbestos Trades - Mesothelioma Death Lawsuit

16 new asbestos cases filed inMadisonCountySept. 21-25
10/9/2009 2:23 PM ByKelly Holleran 

A total of 16 new asbestos lawsuits were filed in Madison County Circuit Court during the week of Sept. 21 through Sept. 25.

The following complaints were filed:

--Mary Bertrand ofOntario alleges the recently deceased Robert Bertrand developed mesothelioma after his work as a laborer and insulator at various locations throughoutIllinois andCanada from 1969 until 2008. Mary Bertrand will be represented by Richard L. Saville Jr., Ethan A. Flint and David J. Page of Saville andFlint inAlton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1003.

--Robert and Isabelle Bullock ofOhio claim Robert Bullock developed mesothelioma after his work as a teacher, minister, bus driver, toll booth operator and self-employed operator of various camps and resorts throughoutIllinois,Missouri,Pennsylvania andNew York from 1950 until 2005. The Bullocks will be represented by Timothy F. Thompson Jr. and Ryan J. Kiwala of Simmons, Browder, Gianaris, Angelides and Barnerd inEast Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1004.

--Walter Cain, a member of the U.S. Navy from 1967 until 1971 and from 1975 and 1977 and a worker at various other jobs until 2007, claims mesothelioma. Cain will be represented by Richard L. Saville Jr. and Ethan A. Flint of Saville andFlint inAlton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1017.

--Bruce Klabunde ofNorth Dakota claims his recently deceased mother, Elizabeth Klabunde, developed mesothelioma after her work as a receptionist and home remodeler at various locations from 1970 until 1979. Bruce Klabunde will be represented by Robert Phillips, Perry J. Browder and Rosalind M. Robertson of Simmons, Browder, Gianaris, Angelides and Barnerd inEast Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1011.

--Gerald and Kathleen LaBathe ofTexas claim Gerald LaBathe developed mesothelioma after his work as a member of the U.S. Army in 1951 and in the National Guard from 1954 until 1974. Gerald LaBathe was also a member of theAsbestos Workers' Local 34 and worked in numerous refineries and chemical plants, according to the complaint. The LaBathes will be represented by Randy L. Gori and Barry Julian of Gori, Julian and Associates in Edwardsville. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1018.

--Dolores Molloy ofIllinois claims her recently deceased husband, Joseph Molloy, developed mesothelioma after his work as an electrician and mechanic at various locations from 1948 until 1985. Dolores Molloy will be represented by Nate Mudd of French and Mudd inSt. Louis. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1025.

--Fabian Moyano claims his recently deceased father, Guillermo Moyano, developed mesothelioma after his work as a superintendent from 1970 until 1979. Fabian Moyano will be represented by Robert Phillips, Perry J. Browder and Rosalind M. Robertson of Simmons, Browder, Gianaris, Angelides and Barnerd inEast Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1010.

--Dexter Napier of Georgia, a laborer at various locations from 1961 until 1979, claims lung cancer. Napier will be represented by Robert Phillips, Perry J. Browder and Rosalind M. Robertson of Simmons, Browder, Gianaris, Angelides and Barnerd inEast Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1012.

--Donald Pattison claims recently deceased Arthella Pattison developed mesothelioma after her work atSt. Johns and Orvid-Elsie schools. She was also exposed to asbestos fibers through her husband, Reo Ivan Pattison, who worked as a press operator. Donald Pattison will be represented by Richard L. Saville Jr., Ethan A. Flint and Andrew J. Balcer of Saville andFlint inAlton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1026.

--Adriana M. Perez of Florida, a laborer at ABC Print Shop in Miami from 1964 until 1979, a laborer at Haiti from 1964 until 1968, an office worker at Nikki Lu in the 1980s and a secretary at a doctor's office in 1985, claims mesothelioma. Perez claims she was also exposed to asbestos fibers through her husband, who worked as a maintenance worker at a foundry, according to the complaint. Perez will be represented by Randy L. Gori and Barry Julian of Gori, Julian and Associates in Edwardsville. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1002.

--Richard W. and Geraldine F. Reeves of Indiana claim Richard W. Reeves developed mesothelioma after his work as a seaman in the U.S. Navy from 1955 until 1958, as a bill collector for various credit and accounting firms from 1958 until 1970 and as a boilermaker for various employees through the international Boilermaker Union from 1970 until 1995. Richard W. Reeves was also exposed to asbestos fibers through his father, who was a millwright for various employers from 1947 until 1955, according to the complaint. Randy L. Gori of Gori, Julian and Associates in Edwardsville will be representing the Reeves. W. Mark Lanier, Patrick N. Haines, Angela B. Greenberg, Sam T. Richard, Bridget B. Truxillo and Lauren H. Ware of The Lanier Law Firm inHouston will serve of counsel. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1005.

--Ella D. Ridout of Texas claims her recently deceased husband, Thomas G. Ridout, developed lung cancer after his work as a member of the U.S. Air Force from 1971 until 1973, as an iron worker, welder and crane operator for various construction companies from 1974 until 1994, as a general foreman for Martin K. Eby from 1994 until 1995, as a general foreman for H.B. Zachry from 1995 until 2001, as a superintendent for Wanzek Construction from 2005 until 2006 and as a general foreman and general superintendent for Fluor. Elizabeth V. Heller and Robert Rowland of Goldenberg, Heller, Antognoli and Rowland in Edwardsville will be representing her. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1006.

--Anne M. Schmuhl ofOhio claims her recently deceased father, Julius M. Storti, developed mesothelioma after his work with Transformer Engineering Corp. from 1943 until 2006. Schmuhl will be represented by Elizabeth V. Heller and Robert Rowland of Goldenberg, Heller, Antognoli and Rowland in Edwardsville. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1014.

--Danielle Taurmina ofNew York claims her recently deceased stepfather, Mario Bosio, developed mesothelioma after his work as a civil engineer and a home remodeler at various locations from 1978 until 1979. Taurmina will be represented by Robert Phillips, Perry J. Browder and Rosalind M. Robertson of Simmons, Browder, Gianaris, Angelides and Barnerd inEast Alton. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1013.

--Maurice Wintermann ofIllinois, a boilermaker, janitor and laborer at various locations from 1950 until 1990, claims mesothelioma. Wintermann will be represented by Andrew O'Brien, Christopher Thoron, Christina J. Neilson, Bartholomew J. Baumstark and Gerald J. FitzGerald of the O'Brien Law Firm inSt. Louis. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1009.

--John J. Worthen of Illinois, a bricklayer for Worthen Brick Construction Company from 1971 until 1976, a bricklayer for Coppers in 1974, a bricklayer for Ser-Steel from 1976 until 1977 and a bricklayer for National Steel and US Steel from 1977 until now, claims lung cancer. Worthen will be represented by Elizabeth V. Heller and Robert Rowland of Goldenberg, Heller, Antognoli and Rowland in Edwardsville. Madison County Circuit Court case number: 09-L-1015

http://www.stclairrecord.com/news/221577-16-new-asbestos-cases-filed-in-madison-county-sept.-21-25

 
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