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ASBESTOS NEWS DAILY - WW II Veterans
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Asbestos Legal: WW II Veterans


 

We connect you with experienced WW II Veterans Mesothelioma Asbestos lawyers. If have been diagnosed with Mesothelioma or an Asbestos related illness we can help you file a claim.

WW II Veterans diagnosed with Mesothelioma and other Asbestos related diseases have legal options and may seek compensation through Mesothelioma litigation.

Filing a claim against the companies that are responsible for your asbestos exposure will help you gain compensation for medical costs and pain and suffering associated with asbestos-related illnesses. A Mesothelioma lawyer can help you pursue compensation for the following things:

  • Lost income
  • Medical bills
  • Group support for yourself and loved ones
  • End-of-life expenses

We help patients and their families make educated, informed decisions about how to proceed with filing Mesothelioma, Asbestosis and other asbestos-related cancer claims.

We will walk you through the entire process of connecting with an experienced WW II Veterans Mesothelioma Lawyer and also help you find a qualified Mesothelioma doctor.

 
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World War II Veterans – Asbestos Exposure – Mesothelioma Death

Inquest finds thatNormandy veteran James Peacock died frommesothelioma

James Peacock during his service in the Second World War

James Peacock during his service in theSecond World War


A D-DAY veteran who landed on the beaches ofNormandy was killed by microscopic particles of asbestos, an inquest has heard.

James Peacock, 86, ofNorthfield Road inPocklington,died on July 2 of last year ofmesothelioma.

York coroner Donald Coverdale heardMr Peacock, a former farmer, began work in 1968 fora builders’ merchants inNorthallerton called Henry Foster Building Products, which later became Ferguson Industrial Holdings.

In a statement written in hospital before his deathMr Peacock said: “We used to take delivery of asbestos sheets measuring 8ft by 4ft. We usually had to get into the back of the truck to move the sheets. They were quite heavy and usually two of us would move them, but there was always quite a lot of dust.”

Mr Peacock said he recalled his overalls getting covered in asbestos dust and then taking them home to be washed.

A post-mortem examination foundMr Peacock had 25,000 mineralfibres per gram of lung tissue. While this was a relatively low result, it was enough to provide a link tomesothelioma considering the workMr Peacock had done.

Mr Coverdale recordedMr Peacock had died from the industrial diseasemesothelioma.

Speaking after the case Jennifer McNally,Mr Peacock’s daughter, said she and her husband could have been affected by the dust as could their two daughters who would run to their grandfather while he was wearing his overalls.

She is now searching for the insurers of Ferguson Industrial Holdings, which no longer exists, to make a claim against them.

She said: “We’re pleased with the verdict because it confirms what we suspected. Mesothelioma is atimebomb ticking and lots of people were exposed to asbestos by accident.”

She said her father had served inNormandy during the Second World War as a Leading Aircraftman in the 83 Group Signals, serving alongside the writer, actor and comedian Eric Sykes.

Allowing parents to set up independent ‘free schools’ with public money is one of the new Government’s flagship policies. Further details are expected later this week. One group of parents in Holgate are eager to find out more. STEPHEN LEWIS reports.

IT was comfortable enough but the result should have been more comprehensive.

http://www.yorkpress.co.uk/news/4532302.Inquest_finds_that_Normandy_veteran_James_Peacock_died_from_mesothelioma/
 
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World War II – Asbestos Exposure – Asbestos and Veterans

Asbestos exposure is frightening

05/20/2010

Over the past few months I’ve been devoting most of the space given to me to a look at Veterans Service Organizations, the Veterans Administration and a brief look at state services for veterans. In this month’s column I would like to digress somewhat and talk about death.

Yesterday afternoon I received a call from an attorney inIllinois. He was calling me in regards to my service onboard the USS Fiske (DDR-842) during the early 1960s. Specifically, he wanted to talk about that period of time that the Fiske spent in the Naval Shipyard atCharleston,South Carolina in the late winter and early spring of 1962.

Now, the Fiske was one of the hundreds of destroyers built just before and duringWorld War II. [For those of you born after 1950 that was the period of time that theUSA, with the help of the British Empire (England,Australia,Canada,New Zealand andIndia)were fighting the forces of fascism (led byGermany andJapan with the occasional and reluctant help ofItaly and much ofFrance)]. That means that in 1962 the Fiske was over 16 years past that day in November 1945 when she became a commissioned part of our Navy. She saw no action during the period of hostilities but made significant contributions to the ‘clean-up’ after the treaties were signed. She cleared mines from theharbor ofVenice in 1946 and 1947. She also aided the Greek government in its overcoming the threat of a communist takeover orchestrated byYugoslavia and the Kremlin.

The Fiske received two Battle Stars for her service during the Korean Conflict and completed her first ‘Around the World’ cruise during that period. In other words she was well-seasoned and needed a bevy of long overdue repairs and updates when she entered the shipyard early in 1961. Most of her previous times spent in shipyards were for conversions and updates to weapons and electronics. This time she would receive much needed maintenance on her engineering spaces.

It is a long held tradition in the Navy that the most junior crewmen do the most menial and dirtiest jobs regardless of the individual’s training. So, when it came time to strip the insulation off all of the steam lines in the engineering spaces each department and division was required to send at least two people to participate in this effort. I was one of those ‘shanghaied’ into this task. We were formed into ‘Tiger Teams’ of five or six and given a section of piping to strip, bag and cart off to dumpsters placed on the fantail. These dumpsters held about two to three cubic yards and were replaced frequently. It was hot, dirty work and the air was filled with dust all the time. It is the composition and quantity of this dust that is important and very germane to the subject at hand—death.

It is a well known fact that man-children in their late teens and early 20s are immortal and able to leap tall buildings in a single bound. We worked in our normal work dungarees—often shirtless and, most importantly, without dust masks. “Dust masks! We don’t needno stinking dust masks.” In fact I don’t recall they were ever even offered to us. The EPA—if it had existed in 1961—would have had a cow upon seeing this Dante’s Inferno of sweat and swirling dust being worked in without any breathing protection in sight. Those steam pipes had been wrapped in the best insulation known in the 1940s—asbestos—and sheathed with coarse canvas held in place with galvanized wire and huge staples.

The routine was this: Remove the wire and staples; unwrap the canvas (no easy task as much lead based paint had been applied over the course of 15 years); separate the molded sections of asbestos off the pipes; and place in bags for transport to the dumpsters. We followed this routine for about six or seven hours a day for a least a week. Most of us did wear cotton work gloves but none to the best of my memory ever wore a mask of any kind other than maybe a handkerchief over nose and mouth. That kerchief did cut down on the coughing from breathing that dust. We never gave a thought to the possible long term consequences of that job at the time. It took a phone call from a lawyer to get me to thinking about that period of time spent in the bowels of a ship that had been built to save the world for democracy.

The word he said that really got my attention was “Mesothelioma.” Now, everybody who has a TV set has probably heard that word spoken by some ambulance chasing lawyer trying to drum up business but when it was used in connection to the death of a shipmate of mine from that period in the early 1960s it got my attention. When I hung up the phone I ‘googledmesothelioma and what I found was scary. Whereas lung cancer has long been associated with years ofsmokingmesothelioma is associated with exposure to asbestos dust. Even a relatively brief exposure to asbestos dust can—years later—lead to a particularly virulent, fast-moving cancer. The truly insidious thing aboutmesothelioma is that there are almost no early symptoms. There may be a small, dry hacking cough that produces little phlegm but that usually occurs later on in the course of the disease. 

It can lay dormant for years and suddenly explode. There seems to be only one course of action to pursue if you feel that you may have been exposed to asbestos dust. That course is to have regular—annually if possible—chest x-rays and/or lung-function tests. Hopefully you can convince your doctor that these are necessary actions and—even more importantly—your health insurer covers the cost. With early detection there is hope. Unless detected early the survival rates are poorer than those of lung cancer associated with smoking—and we all know that is not very good.

More information on this subject can be found at the following links:www.asbestos.com/veterans/veterans-at-risk.php andwww.asbestos.com/veterans/other-branches.php

Now that it is almost 40 years past that these events occurred I am fully aware of the fact that I am most assuredly not immortal and am currently unable to leap tall buildings in a single bound. Not even with a running start. We need to do the prudent things but not obsess over the things over which we have no control. To quote the great contemporary philosopher James Dean (1931-1955): Dream as if you’ll live forever. Live as if you’ll die today.

This column is dedicated to the memory of Robert Chaffee, BT2, USS FISKE (DDR 842).Fair winds and following seas, shipmate.

http://riverjournal.com/vivvo/features/veterans/veterans_asbestos_beyer_052010.html

 
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World War II Asbestos – Asbestos Exposure – Asbestos History

 

A Brief History of Asbestos

Posted: Aug 03, 2008

 

Asbestos is a naturally-occurring fibrous mineral ofmetamorpic hydrous magnesium silicate. The term "metamorphic" is used to describe a process of extreme heat and pressure which creates specific secondary patterns of minerals with new chemical and/or physical properties. 

As the primary rock is heated andrecooled, silicate crystals align in long rows of mineral fibers, which easily separate into tiny shards thinner than a human hair. Asbestos fibers are not a health risk as long as they are undisturbed. However, when asbestos is undergoes natural weathering, or is mined and processed, the microscopic particles waft into the air and cause disease if they are inhaled. 

Asbestosis occurs when an inhaled asbestos particle irritates the body's naturaldefence mechanisms, causing inflammation and scarring which eventually restricts lung function.Mesothelioma is a malignant tumor of the membranes surrounding the heart, lungs and abdominal cavity. Asbestos can also cause cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, larynx, stomach, lung and lymphoid tissue.

Asbestos exposure can also cause non-fatal illnesses such as asbestos warts, caused when asbestos fibers are lodged in the skin, causing lumps of scar tissue to form around the irritant in the same manner as they do in the lungs to cause asbestosis; pleural plaques, discrete, sometimes calcified fibrous lesions which can be seen on X-rays but are too small to cause breathing impairment; and diffuse pleural thickening, which can cause breathing impairment if it is extensive.

Due to its fire resistant properties, asbestos has been used historically for household and industrial purposes. It has been found woven into burial cloths in ancientEgypt, and Charlemagne reportedly had a tablecloth made of asbestos which he would throw into a fire to clean. 

InWorld War II asbestos was considered so important by the War Department that it was considered a strategic material, and many American workers wereexposed in the World War II boom in shipbuilding. After the war, it was widely used in the construction industry.

In modern Western society, it was used for such diverse purposes as lamp wicks, brake shoes, oven insulation, electrical hotplate wiring and home insulation, roofing and flooring. For instance, some kinds of vermiculite used in home insulation into the 1970s contained asbestos. The EPA banned this product in 1977. 

When a home owner discoversasbestos in an old home, it should not be a cause for immediate panic. If the asbestos looks intact and is notpulverised, it is best to leave it alone. However, because of legal liability, schools and businesses containing asbestos usually must undergo a costly removal process, hazardous in itself because disturbing the stable asbestos product causes fibers to fill the air. Special equipment must be used to insure that the removal process does not cause health problems where non existed before.

Mostindustrialised nations have reduced or banned the use of asbestos for at least 30 years and now use fiberglass or woven ceramic fiber as a substitute, but since asbestos-caused disease has a latency period of up to 50 years, patients are still presenting with these illness today. Every year inAmerica, approximately 3000 new cases ofmesothelioma are diagnosed, and 550 deaths occurs due to asbestosis. According to the March 1991 Report of the Judicial Conference Ad Hoc Committee on Asbestos Litigation, asbestos exposure has caused the deaths of approximately 200,000 to 265,000 Americans.

Asbestos use peaked in theUnited States in 1973, when 1 million tons of the material were used. The EPA attempted to institute a complete legal ban on the use of asbestos products in 1989; however, this ban was largely eviscerated by the US 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in 1991, and some restricted use of asbestos, albeit in fewer products than before, resumed. Therefore, even today some workers are being exposed to this toxic material. 

Asbestos is a serious continuing concern to the Environmental Protection Agency, and their website has detailed information on asbestos and its removal.

Concerns about the health risks of asbestos exposure date back to 1898, when the Chief Inspector of Factories of theUnited Kingdom reported to Parliament in his Annual Report about the "evil effects of asbestos dust". He noted that the "sharp, glass like nature of the particles" when allowed to remain suspended in the air, "have been found to be injurious, as might have been expected". In 1906 a British Parliamentary Commission confirmed the first cases of asbestos-related deaths in British factories and called for improved ventilation and other safety measures. In 1918 an American insurance company produced a study showing premature deaths in the asbestos industry in theUnited States and in 1926 the Massachusetts Industrial Accidents Board processed the first successful claim by a sick asbestos worker.

Today, lawsuits claiming compensation for asbestos-related illnesses are a growth industry in the legal profession. An internet search of "mesothelioma lawyer" yields 1,910,000 results. The original manufacturers of asbestos products have long since been driven into Chapter 11 bankruptcy; plaintiffs have now turned to suing corporations with peripheral connections to asbestos products. More than 70 American corporations have filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy in due to asbestos liability claims.

Since the 1970's, approximately 6% of all lawsuits filed in American courts have been asbestos-related. The lawsuits now facing the courts have been described as "an elephantine mass" by the US Supreme Court, and are expected to cost between 200 to 275 billion dollars to settle. Asbestos liability is one of the largest issues facing the global insurance industry today. 

Most epidemiological studies expected the number of lawsuits to peak in the 1990s, but this has not occurred, either because of the long latency period of asbestos-related diseases, or because legal action is becoming more popular among asbestos-exposed members of the public due to high-profile legal cases and widespread advertising by attorneys who specialize in such cases.

Many complaints have been made by representatives of industries facing lawsuits and the insurance companies who will be expected to pay them that the asbestos-lawsuit industry is rife with fraud, with less that half of all payouts reaching the plaintiffs. Aggressive, ambulance-chasing lawyers are said to exaggerate medical disability and coach clients on their testimony. 

The group of plaintiffs includes not only ill people, but also those who have merely have a history of asbestos exposure and want compensation for potential future health risks. According to theAmericanAcademy ofActuraries Mass Tort Work Group, more than 100 million Americans have been exposed to asbestos in their workplace during the past century.

(ArticlesBaseSC #507855)

Christian Ward - About the Author:

Christian is an author of several articles pertaining to No Win No Fee, Compensation Claims, Work Accident Claims, Personal Injury Claims and other legal articles.


Read more: http://www.articlesbase.com/personal-injury-articles/a-brief-history-of-asbestos-507855.html#ixzz0pGoSBlC1 
Under Creative Commons License: Attribution

 

http://www.articlesbase.com/personal-injury-articles/a-brief-history-of-asbestos-507855.html
 
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Shipbuilding – Asbestos Trades –Asbestos History

 

A Brief History of Asbestos

Posted: Aug 03, 2008

 

Asbestos is a naturally-occurring fibrous mineral ofmetamorpic hydrous magnesium silicate. The term "metamorphic" is used to describe a process of extreme heat and pressure which creates specific secondary patterns of minerals with new chemical and/or physical properties. 

As the primary rock is heated andrecooled, silicate crystals align in long rows of mineral fibers, which easily separate into tiny shards thinner than a human hair.Asbestos fibers are not a health risk as long as they are undisturbed. However, when asbestos is undergoes natural weathering, or is mined and processed, the microscopic particles waft into the air and cause disease if they are inhaled. 

Asbestosis occurs when an inhaled asbestos particle irritates the body's naturaldefence mechanisms, causing inflammation and scarring which eventually restricts lung function.Mesothelioma is a malignant tumor of the membranes surrounding the heart, lungs and abdominal cavity. Asbestos can also cause cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, larynx, stomach, lung and lymphoid tissue.

Asbestos exposure can also cause non-fatal illnesses such as asbestos warts, caused when asbestos fibers are lodged in the skin, causing lumps of scar tissue to form around the irritant in the same manner as they do in the lungs to cause asbestosis; pleural plaques, discrete, sometimes calcified fibrous lesions which can be seen on X-rays but are too small to cause breathing impairment; and diffuse pleural thickening, which can cause breathing impairment if it is extensive.

Due to its fire resistant properties, asbestos has been used historically for household and industrial purposes. It has been found woven into burial cloths in ancientEgypt, and Charlemagne reportedly had a tablecloth made of asbestos which he would throw into a fire to clean. 

In World War II asbestos was considered so important by the War Department that it was considered a strategic material, and many American workers were exposed in the World War II boom inshipbuilding. After the war, it was widely used in the construction industry.

In modern Western society, it was used for such diverse purposes as lamp wicks, brake shoes, oven insulation, electrical hotplate wiring and home insulation, roofing and flooring. For instance, some kinds of vermiculite used in home insulation into the 1970s contained asbestos. The EPA banned this product in 1977. 

When a home owner discovers asbestos in an old home, it should not be a cause for immediate panic. If the asbestos looks intact and is notpulverised, it is best to leave it alone. However, because of legal liability, schools and businesses containing asbestos usually must undergo a costly removal process, hazardous in itself because disturbing the stable asbestos product causes fibers to fill the air. Special equipment must be used to insure that the removal process does not cause health problems where non existed before.

Mostindustrialised nations have reduced or banned the use of asbestos for at least 30 years and now use fiberglass or woven ceramic fiber as a substitute, but since asbestos-caused disease has a latency period of up to 50 years, patients are still presenting with these illness today. Every year inAmerica, approximately 3000 new cases ofmesothelioma are diagnosed, and 550 deaths occurs due to asbestosis. According to the March 1991 Report of the Judicial Conference Ad Hoc Committee on Asbestos Litigation, asbestos exposure has caused the deaths of approximately 200,000 to 265,000 Americans.

Asbestos use peaked in theUnited States in 1973, when 1 million tons of the material were used. The EPA attempted to institute a complete legal ban on the use of asbestos products in 1989; however, this ban was largely eviscerated by the US 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in 1991, and some restricted use of asbestos, albeit in fewer products than before, resumed. Therefore, even today some workers are being exposed to this toxic material. 

Asbestos is a serious continuing concern to the Environmental Protection Agency, and their website has detailed information on asbestos and its removal.

Concerns about the health risks of asbestos exposure date back to 1898, when the Chief Inspector of Factories of theUnited Kingdom reported to Parliament in his Annual Report about the "evil effects of asbestos dust". He noted that the "sharp, glass like nature of the particles" when allowed to remain suspended in the air, "have been found to be injurious, as might have been expected". In 1906 a British Parliamentary Commission confirmed the first cases of asbestos-related deaths in British factories and called for improved ventilation and other safety measures. In 1918 an American insurance company produced a study showing premature deaths in the asbestos industry in theUnited States and in 1926 the Massachusetts Industrial Accidents Board processed the first successful claim by a sick asbestos worker.

Today, lawsuits claiming compensation for asbestos-related illnesses are a growth industry in the legal profession. An internet search of "mesothelioma lawyer" yields 1,910,000 results. The original manufacturers of asbestos products have long since been driven into Chapter 11 bankruptcy; plaintiffs have now turned to suing corporations with peripheral connections to asbestos products. More than 70 American corporations have filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy in due to asbestos liability claims.

Since the 1970's, approximately 6% of all lawsuits filed in American courts have been asbestos-related. The lawsuits now facing the courts have been described as "an elephantine mass" by the US Supreme Court, and are expected to cost between 200 to 275 billion dollars to settle. Asbestos liability is one of the largest issues facing the global insurance industry today. 

Most epidemiological studies expected the number of lawsuits to peak in the 1990s, but this has not occurred, either because of the long latency period of asbestos-related diseases, or because legal action is becoming more popular among asbestos-exposed members of the public due to high-profile legal cases and widespread advertising by attorneys who specialize in such cases.

Many complaints have been made by representatives of industries facing lawsuits and the insurance companies who will be expected to pay them that the asbestos-lawsuit industry is rife with fraud, with less that half of all payouts reaching the plaintiffs. Aggressive, ambulance-chasing lawyers are said to exaggerate medical disability and coach clients on their testimony. 

The group of plaintiffs includes not only ill people, but also those who have merely have a history of asbestos exposure and want compensation for potential future health risks. According to theAmericanAcademy ofActuraries Mass Tort Work Group, more than 100 million Americans have been exposed to asbestos in their workplace during the past century.

(ArticlesBaseSC #507855)

Christian Ward - About the Author:

Christian is an author of several articles pertaining to No Win No Fee, Compensation Claims, Work Accident Claims, Personal Injury Claims and other legal articles.


Read more: http://www.articlesbase.com/personal-injury-articles/a-brief-history-of-asbestos-507855.html#ixzz0pGoSBlC1 
Under Creative Commons License: Attribution

 

http://www.articlesbase.com/personal-injury-articles/a-brief-history-of-asbestos-507855.html
 
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Asbestos World War II – Asbestos Medical –Asbestos History

 

A Brief History of Asbestos

Posted: Aug 03, 2008

 

Asbestos is a naturally-occurring fibrous mineral ofmetamorpic hydrous magnesium silicate. The term "metamorphic" is used to describe a process of extreme heat and pressure which creates specific secondary patterns of minerals with new chemical and/or physical properties. 

As the primary rock is heated andrecooled, silicate crystals align in long rows of mineral fibers, which easily separate into tiny shards thinner than a human hair. Asbestos fibers are not a health risk as long as they are undisturbed. However, when asbestos is undergoes natural weathering, or is mined and processed, the microscopic particles waft into the air and cause disease if they are inhaled. 

Asbestosis occurs when an inhaled asbestos particle irritates the body's naturaldefence mechanisms, causing inflammation and scarring which eventually restricts lung function. Mesothelioma is a malignant tumor of the membranes surrounding the heart, lungs and abdominal cavity. Asbestos can also cause cancer of the mouth, throat, esophagus, larynx, stomach, lung and lymphoid tissue.

Asbestos exposure can also cause non-fatal illnesses such as asbestos warts, caused when asbestos fibers are lodged in the skin, causing lumps of scar tissue to form around the irritant in the same manner as they do in the lungs to cause asbestosis; pleural plaques, discrete, sometimes calcified fibrous lesions which can be seen on X-rays but are too small to cause breathing impairment; and diffuse pleural thickening, which can cause breathing impairment if it is extensive.

Due to its fire resistant properties, asbestos has been used historically for household and industrial purposes. It has been found woven into burial cloths in ancientEgypt, and Charlemagne reportedly had a tablecloth made of asbestos which he would throw into a fire to clean. 

InWorld War II asbestos was considered so important by the War Department that it was considered a strategic material, and many American workers were exposed in the World War II boom in shipbuilding. After the war, it was widely used in the construction industry.

In modern Western society, it was used for such diverse purposes as lamp wicks, brake shoes, oven insulation, electrical hotplate wiring and home insulation, roofing and flooring. For instance, some kinds of vermiculite used in home insulation into the 1970s contained asbestos. The EPA banned this product in 1977. 

When a home owner discovers asbestos in an old home, it should not be a cause for immediate panic. If the asbestos looks intact and is notpulverised, it is best to leave it alone. However, because of legal liability, schools and businesses containing asbestos usually must undergo a costly removal process, hazardous in itself because disturbing the stable asbestos product causes fibers to fill the air. Special equipment must be used to insure that the removal process does not cause health problems where non existed before.

Mostindustrialised nations have reduced or banned the use of asbestos for at least 30 years and now use fiberglass or woven ceramic fiber as a substitute, but since asbestos-caused disease has a latency period of up to 50 years, patients are still presenting with these illness today. Every year inAmerica, approximately 3000 new cases ofmesothelioma are diagnosed, and 550 deaths occurs due to asbestosis. According to the March 1991 Report of the Judicial Conference Ad Hoc Committee on Asbestos Litigation, asbestos exposure has caused the deaths of approximately 200,000 to 265,000 Americans.

Asbestos use peaked in theUnited States in 1973, when 1 million tons of the material were used. The EPA attempted to institute a complete legal ban on the use of asbestos products in 1989; however, this ban was largely eviscerated by the US 5th Circuit Court of Appeals in 1991, and some restricted use of asbestos, albeit in fewer products than before, resumed. Therefore, even today some workers are being exposed to this toxic material. 

Asbestos is a serious continuing concern to the Environmental Protection Agency, and their website has detailed information on asbestos and its removal.

Concerns about the health risks of asbestos exposure date back to 1898, when the Chief Inspector of Factories of theUnited Kingdom reported to Parliament in his Annual Report about the "evil effects of asbestos dust". He noted that the "sharp, glass like nature of the particles" when allowed to remain suspended in the air, "have been found to be injurious, as might have been expected". In 1906 a British Parliamentary Commission confirmed the first cases of asbestos-related deaths in British factories and called for improved ventilation and other safety measures. In 1918 an American insurance company produced a study showing premature deaths in the asbestos industry in theUnited States and in 1926 the Massachusetts Industrial Accidents Board processed the first successful claim by a sick asbestos worker.

Today, lawsuits claiming compensation for asbestos-related illnesses are a growth industry in the legal profession. An internet search of "mesothelioma lawyer" yields 1,910,000 results. The original manufacturers of asbestos products have long since been driven into Chapter 11 bankruptcy; plaintiffs have now turned to suing corporations with peripheral connections to asbestos products. More than 70 American corporations have filed Chapter 11 bankruptcy in due to asbestos liability claims.

Since the 1970's, approximately 6% of all lawsuits filed in American courts have been asbestos-related. The lawsuits now facing the courts have been described as "an elephantine mass" by the US Supreme Court, and are expected to cost between 200 to 275 billion dollars to settle. Asbestos liability is one of the largest issues facing the global insurance industry today. 

Most epidemiological studies expected the number of lawsuits to peak in the 1990s, but this has not occurred, either because of the long latency period of asbestos-related diseases, or because legal action is becoming more popular among asbestos-exposed members of the public due to high-profile legal cases and widespread advertising by attorneys who specialize in such cases.

Many complaints have been made by representatives of industries facing lawsuits and the insurance companies who will be expected to pay them that the asbestos-lawsuit industry is rife with fraud, with less that half of all payouts reaching the plaintiffs. Aggressive, ambulance-chasing lawyers are said to exaggerate medical disability and coach clients on their testimony. 

The group of plaintiffs includes not only ill people, but also those who have merely have a history of asbestos exposure and want compensation for potential future health risks. According to theAmericanAcademy ofActuraries Mass Tort Work Group, more than 100 million Americans have been exposed to asbestos in their workplace during the past century.

(ArticlesBaseSC #507855)

Christian Ward - About the Author:

Christian is an author of several articles pertaining to No Win No Fee, Compensation Claims, Work Accident Claims, Personal Injury Claims and other legal articles.


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Postal Worker – Asbestos Trades - $2 Million Asbestos Verdict

 

$2 million awarded in local asbestos case

Former city man blames cancer on products used in odd jobs

By CHRIS DETTRO

THE STATE JOURNAL-REGISTER

Posted Aug 17, 2009 @ 11:29 PM

Last update Aug 18, 2009 @ 12:40 AM

ASangamonCounty jury last week awarded a formerSpringfieldpostal worker and part-time handyman $2 million at the conclusion of an asbestos-exposure trial.

William Willis, who lived most of his life in the Williamsville area and onSpringfield’s north end, was a night-shiftU.S. Postal Service employee from 1966 until retiring in 1992. He testified during the 3 /2-week trial before Circuit Judge Pete Cavanagh that he did various odd jobs during the day, including truck and bus driving and home construction and repair in the 1960s, ’70s and ’80s.

Willis alleged in his suit that he had used asbestos-containing pipe manufactured by CertainTeed Corp. and asbestos-containing joint compound made by Bondex International Inc. and Georgia-Pacific Corp., among others. Asbestos was phased out of the products in 1977.

Willis, now 69 and living inArkansas, alleged that he had developed incurable pleural mesothelioma, a cancer of the lung lining, as a result of exposure to the asbestos. He said in his suit that the products contained no warnings concerning the asbestos content, and if there were warnings, they were inadequate.

The jury found Bondex International alone liable and awarded Willis $1.5 million in damages and his wife, Sharon Willis, $500,000 for loss of consortium. It found CertainTeed and Georgia-Pacific not to be negligent. 

The defendants argued that Willis had used their products decades ago and was mistaken about which products he actually used. Their attorneys also argued that the amount of asbestos in the defendants’ products wasn’t enough to harm, and that there was no known cause for Willis’ mesothelioma.

Other defendants either settled with Willis or were dismissed from the case prior to the verdict.
Stephen Kaufmann of theSpringfield office of HeplerBroom LLC, along with other HeplerBroom colleagues, represented Georgia-Pacific, one of the three defendants who remained through trial.

“I think the jury heard a very complex case and returned a verdict that was supported by the evidence and brought justice to Mr. And Mrs. Willis,” said Jack Davis of Davis Law Offices LLC inSpringfield, a member of Willis’ legal team.

Davis also praised the way Cavanagh handled the trial.

“The courtroom can be a very tough atmosphere, and when you have a level-headed, even-tempered judge who is fair to both sides, it makes the lawyers’ jobs so much easier,” he said. 

Willis’ pretrial motion asking to add a claim for punitive damages was denied.

The jury award is subject to a reduction of $1.4 million due to prior settlement amounts.

Chris Dettro can be reached at 788-1510.

Copyright 2009 The State Journal-Register. Some rights reserved

 

http://www.sj-r.com/business/x640866866/-2-million-awarded-in-local-abestos-case

 
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